• No, BCC members should not distribute announcements or other informational materials to other committee members via e-mail, “snail mail”, or phone.  Such material should go directly to the support staff for distribution.  To avoid violations of the open meeting law, committee members should avoid any action or discussion on potential committee-related topics outside of an official meeting.

      • The Chairperson and Vice Chairperson are selected by the City Council.  The Chairperson generally approves the agendas, presides over and keeps the order of the meetings, and acts as the spokesperson for the particular BCC.

      • The Open Meeting Law requires a minimum of 24 hours notice prior to the meeting start time, however 2-5 days prior to the meeting is preferable.

      • City of Prescott Boards, Commissions, and Committees (BCC) are public bodies that have been created by the Mayor or Council for specific purposes.  BCC’s provide advice to the governing body by working with City staff to facilitate studies, gather public input, and assemble appropriate information for presentations to the Mayor and Council to assist in their decision making process.

      • Upon absence of the Chairperson, those duties are assumed by the Vice Chairperson.

      • Ex-officio members are usually City staff assigned to carry out administrative functions of the BCC and may act as a liaison to City management.  Ex-officio members may participate in discussions as much as permissible by the Chair, but they may not count towards a quorum nor cast any votes.

      • Meetings will commence upon discretion of the Chairperson.  As a general rule, it would be appropriate to allow 15 minutes for late arrivals if waiting for a quorum to assemble.

      • Membership on most BCC’s are for two-year, non-staggered terms, appointed by the City Council in March of even-numbered years, following the previous fall election.

      • The Chairperson may call for votes to be taken by voice vote or by roll call.  If there are any questions as to the outcome of a voice vote, the BCC shall take a roll call vote for clarification.

      • Members of all BCC’s are volunteers and serve without compensation.

      • Items sold by Prescott based businesses via the Internet to residents of Arizona are taxable and reported to the City at the 2.75% tax rate. The State would also collect taxes on sales made within Arizona.

      • The combined tax rate for the State of Arizona, Yavapai County, and the City of Prescott for most taxable activities is 9.10%. The combined rate consists of 5.6% for the State, 0.75% for the County and 2.75% for the City of Prescott.

      • 1% is for the General Fund, 1% is for street improvements, and 0.75% goes to the PSPRS unfunded liability.

      Budget & Finance Reports

      • The City’s fiscal year is from July 1 to June 30.

    • Employment Details

      • There are multiple outlets for following our open positions. Follow the City of Prescott on Facebook for the latest news and career opportunities. You may also sign up for Job Alert emails on our Career Page by simply providing your email.

      • After the position closing date, your application will be reviewed by the subject matter experts in the department you have applied for. Interviews will be scheduled by the Human Resources Department immediately following our review of applications received.

      • To make it easier for our candidates, The City of Prescott may conduct phone or Skype™ to complete our first round of interviews. The City of Prescott Skype username is PrescottHR. Please test your computer settings to ensure a quality electronic interview. All positions will require an on-site interview at some point during the pre-employment process.

      New Hire Information

      • If you are having trouble with your application password or login, you may contact our Customer Experience Team at (888) 633-9269 or email support@applicantpro.com

        • If you are a member of the media, please contact Communications.
        • If you would like to contact the Mayor or a Councilmember, contact information can be found here
        • If you would like to contact a specific department, contact information can be found here
      • Historical records regarding property can be obtained at City Hall, Sharlot Hall Museum Archives, the Yavapai County Recorder’s and Assessor’s Offices, Arizona State Archives and from other sources. Both the City of Prescott and Sharlot Hall Museum have handouts, which will help you with your research.

      • You must purchase a plaque. Yavapai Heritage Foundation has a National Register plaque program for property owners. You can contact Cat Moody at 777-1309 for more information.

      • Surveys of historic resources and National Register Nominations have been completed in several Prescott neighborhoods including East Prescott, West Prescott, Fleury’s Additions, Prescott Armory, South Prescott Townsite, Mile High Park, Joslin and Whipple, Whipple Heights and Pine Crest. Also, many outstanding structures located in several historic areas of Prescott were placed on the National Register in 1978 as part of a Multiple Resource area.The Prescott Preservation Commission and staff also work with neighborhood groups and other organizations to carry out special projects such as the Courthouse Plaza Historic Preservation District.

      Historic Preservation

      • The City of Prescott has records on all listed properties. Any staff member in the Community Development Department can look up this information for you. For more specific information on your property, contact the Preservation Specialist at 928-777-1309. You can also access the State Historic Preservation Office website.

      • The National Register is the country’s official list of historic properties. It does not place restriction or protections on privately owned property. The City of Prescott works with owners of these properties to maintain or enhance the historic integrity of the building whenever work is to be done. Property tax credits and other benefits are available to owners.

      • The City of Prescott participates in the Certified Local Government (CLG) program, which is a nationwide program of technical and financial assistance to preserve historic buildings. Responsibilities of a CLG include maintaining a historic preservation commission, (provide link to Land Development Code, Section 8.5) surveying local historic properties, providing public input and enforcing state and local preservation laws.

      • This is an overlay zoning district created by City Ordinance at the request of at least 51% of the property owners in the district. It places protections on the historic integrity of the neighborhood and requires pre-approval for all work which requires a City permit, including window and siding replacement, new roofs, any structural work, plumbing and electrical work etc.

      • City Code requires that all work requiring permits within a historic preservation (local) district be approved by the Preservations Commission in order to help to preserve the historic integrity of the building and the neighborhood. National statistics show that historic preservation districts help to stabilize and enhance property values, add a sense of history and an understanding of the historical importance of a community or neighborhood and enhance pride in neighborhoods.

      • NO: If only minor repairs such as replacing a light fixture, outlet, toilet or faucet, or fixing a leak.
        YES: If any new wiring or plumbing pipe is extended or installed.

      • YES: If it is a residential building and the owner lives there, he or she can do all the work as long as it complies with code. If it is commercial, the owner can do general work (framing, drywall, and concrete) only if he or she is going to be the only person to occupy or be in the building.
        NO: If it is a commercial building a State-licensed contractor is required for all work when the public or employees will visit, occupy or be in the building.

      • Yes, There are several safety related issues the inspector will check for. These include the expansion tank, temperature/pressure relief valve, combustion air for gas appliances, and, if installed in a garage, the proper height above the floor.

      • The Arizona State Board of Technical Registration regulates when a project requires a registrant. According to Rule R4-30-301 a registrant is not required for single family homes but is required for all new, additions, and remodel projects for commercial and multi-family projects over 3,000 square feet in area. This applies to remodel projects in strip malls for example if the over all building size exceeds 3,000 square feet even if the space being remodeled is less than 3,000 square feet. State Board of Technical Registration.

      • A permit ensures that the City Building Inspection Division will inspect the work. The inspector may discover faulty materials, deviations from the approved plans or violations of the building codes and land use codes that may result in an unsafe or hazardous condition for you or your family. It is a violation of City ordinance not to have a permit when work being done requires one. Failure to obtain a permit may result in an investigation fee being added to the cost of the permit and/or may result in prosecution in city court.

      Development Impact Fees

      • Yes, but the amount of a Development Impact Fee will vary based on the location of the property and the infrastructure that is needed to bring water and sewer service to that location. Properties located in existing neighborhoods will generally see lesser Development Impact Fees. Use the on-line estimator to estimate the amount of Development Impact Fees to be paid by Clicking Here (this “Click Here” should take them to the Impact Fee Estimator)

      • Development Impact Fees are paid to offset costs to the City associated with providing necessary public services.

        The “Water Resource Development Fee” is used for the acquisition of additional water resources as identified in the Cities most recent “Infrastructure Improvement Plan”.

        The “Development Fees for Water System Impacts” is used for improvements related to water production, treatment, transmission and distribution system, such as tanks, water lines, pump stations and wells as identified in the most recent “Infrastructure Improvement Plan”.

        The “Development Fees for Wastewater System Impacts” is used for improvements related to the City’s wastewater treatment and collections system, such as the wastewater treatment plant, the water reclamation facility, sewer lines and lift stations, as identified in the most recent “Infrastructure Improvement Plan”.

      • City Council adopted Ordinance 4889-1427 that assesses impact fees for any new development. These fees help to pay for the infrastructure needed to serve new development.

      Impact Fee Estimator

      • No, once Impact Fees are paid, they are non-refundable.

      • No, all Impact Fees paid shall apply to the real property upon which the structure is located and Impact Fees are not transferable between properties.

      • Monies received for Impact Fees must be accounted for separately from other monies the City collects per Arizona Revised Statues. As a result, if the Council chose to waive Impact Fees assessed on a specific development, the City is required by State law to reimburse the appropriate Impact Fee accounts for the amount that was waived from another funding source.

      • Impact Fees are based on the size of the water meter. If additional water fixtures are added that warrant an upsizing of an existing water meter the Impact Fees to be paid would be the difference between the current Impact Fee for the existing meter versus the current Impact Fee for the upsized meter.

      • To calculate the size of the water meter needed fill out the City “Utility Tie-in Application and Fixture Tabulation Sheet”. Then, call 928-777-1269 or visit the City of Prescott Permit Center located at 201 S Cortez St. A Public Works representative will be able to assist with sizing of the water meter.

      • A residential unit is a room or group of room s within a building containing cooking accommodations, and used or designed or intended for use or occupancy by an individual or individuals as common living quarters. An apartment, manufactured home, modular home and mobile home shall be considered a residential unit, but a hotel room or motel room is not considered a residential unit for the purposes of assessing Impact Fees.

      • Impact Fees are paid at the time of issuance of a building permit. The amount of the fees is based on the size of the water meter required to serve the property and the location.
        Impact Fee Estimator

      • Alterations or expansions of existing residential structures where no additional residential units are created and where no additional demand for services is created by the alteration or expansion.

      • In the event that a one-inch meter is required solely as a result of a residential unit being equipped with an automatic fire sprinkler system, the Impact Fee to be assessed shall be based on a 5/8” water meter size, however, this exception does not apply to residences that are 5,000 square feet or more in size.

      Right of Way Permits

      • Lane closures are common during work in the Right-of-Way.  A traffic control plan is needed to close a lane in the roadway.  All lane closures are reviewed as part of the Right-of-Way permit process.

      • These kinds of activities can be done in the Right-of-Way for limited periods of time with a Right-of-Way permit.

      • When a complete Right-of-Way permit is submitted to the City, the City will review the permit and it’s contents within 3-5 working days.  It is recommended, to apply for a Right-of-Way permit a minimum of 2 weeks prior to the start of construction in order to avoid any delays.

      • The answer is “Yes” under specific criteria.  This criteria can be found in City Code Chapter 8-2-4.

      • The placement of mailboxes, newspaper receptacles and sales racks, the planting or removal of any tree or shrubbery, bike racks, planters, sidewalk sales by businesses, tables, benches and chairs adjacent to a duly licensed business, sandwich board signs, off-site signage in the right-of-way, kiosks owned by the City and campaign signs are not required to have a permit.  However, please note that while these uses are allowed without a permit, in many cases there are other rules and restrictions under which these activities may occur.  Please contact the Permit Center at 928-777-1269 for more information.

      • Any public street, highway, alley, sidewalk or other platted or written easement which has been dedicated to, or accepted by, or acquired by, the City for public purposes.

      • There is a $50 fee for a Right-of-Way permit.  Additional fees may apply if the work includes utility tapping, new water or sewer services, grading or erosion and sediment control measures.

      • A Right-of-Way permit is needed when an improvement is proposed in the Right-of-Way.  An improvement includes but is not limited to grading or re-grading, placing of base materials, paving or repaving, construction or reconstruction of any sidewalk, driveway approach, curb, curb and gutter, bike path, alley gutter or cross gutter, the placement of any bench or planter box or other solid object, traffic-control and protection devices, striping and fences, the planting or removal of any tree or shrubbery, the placing, relocating or transporting of any structure, excavations for the installation or repair of any sanitary sewer line, water line, gas line, electrical line, television cable, telephone line or appurtenant facilities, and the installation or repair of any storm drain, drainage structures or appurtenant facilities.

      • A registered contractor in the State of Arizona is required when working in the Right-of-Way unless the activity is listed as an exemption under City Code Chapter 8-2-4. There is more information regarding licensing requirements in the “Right-of-Way Application”.

    • Projects in Design

      • Project Managers contact information can be found by clicking on the + sign next to the project name on the list, then clicking on “Contact Information”.

      • Public meetings and information on projects can be found by clicking on the + sign next to the project name on the list, then clicking on “Public Meeting Notices” or by contacting the Project Manager at 928-777-1130.

      • They require each project to:

        1. Primarily benefit low-to moderate-income persons,
        2. Prevent or eliminate slum and blight, or
        3. Meet other urgent community development needs relating to health and safety issues.
      • “Low and moderate income” refers to the total annual family income that is less than 80 percent of the average income for same-size families in that area.

      Community Development Block Grants

      • Yes. Community applications for CDBG funds must meet the “National Objectives” established by Congress.

      • CDBG funds can be used to:

        • Rehabilitate homes owned and occupied by LM persons or rental units in which at least 51 percent of the tenants are or will be LM and will pay “affordable rents”
        • Acquire property to be sold to LM persons or to be converted primarily to rental housing, with at least 51 percent of the units to be occupied by LM persons;
        • Acquire or clear property to be sold or leased to a private developer;
        • Construct off-site improvements for a developer who will build homes at least 51 percent of which will be sold to or constructed by (self-help) LM persons; or
        • Construct or rehabilitate shelters and transitional housing for the homeless.
      • CDBG funds can be used to:

        • Lend funds to a business;
        • Provide the business with a loan guarantee;
        • Install a water line allowing a business to locate or expand;
        • Acquire land to be leased to a business; or
        • Provide training and support services to low-to-moderate income persons wishing to start their own businesses.
        • In most cases, the business must agree to create or retain a reasonable number of jobs in relation to the CDBG assistance and hire 51 percent LM income persons.
      • Yes. Every community applying for CDBG funds must hold at least two public hearings to let residents identify possible projects. Public hearing notices also must be published in the local newspapers. These notices must be published before the community can send its application to HUD, and they must inform the public about the process to comment on projects recommended by elected officials. Notice of public meetings can also be posted at the local city hall.

      • They require each project to:

        1. Primarily benefit low-to moderate-income persons,
        2. Prevent or eliminate slum and blight, or
        3. Meet other urgent community development needs relating to health and safety issues.
      • Like all federally funded programs, the CDBG program requires that the community comply with a number of requirements relating to record keeping, competitive procurement and public participation. The community must also comply with other federal “overlay” laws. These relate to protection of the environment, acquisition and relocation, civil rights/nondiscrimination and the payment of Davis-Bacon prevailing wages and other construction labor standards.

      • A wide variety of activities including:

        • Street, water and wastewater improvements;
        • Housing rehabilitation or buying land for new housing development;
        • The construction of or improvements to parks, libraries, health clinics, shelters for domestic violence victims or the homeless;
        • Salaries of people who provide public services such as child care or job training, or paying for furniture for such programs; and
        • Loans and other kinds of assistance so businesses can hire new employees.
      • “Low and moderate income” refers to the total annual family income that is less than 80 percent of the average income for same-size families in that area.

      • Please advise the Film Office of the project and to determine whether or not a permit is necessary. Generally, projects that take place on public and/or City-owned property (i.e., sidewalks, streets, lakes and parks) within the City of Prescott require a permit. If you are uncertain, please call the Film Office and we can assist you.

      • The more time we have, the better we can assist you. Please call the Film Office as soon as you know you will be working in Prescott. Some locations require reservations or other advance arrangements.

      • Fees vary by location and the scope of the project. Please contact our office for information.

      Film Office

      • If your project will include a drone, or Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS), we can generally accommodate you, although some limitations may exist. Please contact our office for information.

      • Please advise the Film Office of the project and to determine whether or not a permit is necessary. Generally, projects that take place on public and/or City-owned property (i.e., sidewalks, streets, lakes and parks) within the City of Prescott require a permit. If you are uncertain, please call the Film Office and we can assist you.

      • The more time we have, the better we can assist you. Please call the Film Office as soon as you know you will be working in Prescott. Some locations require reservations or other advance arrangements.

      • Fees vary by location and the scope of the project. Please contact our office for information.

    • Traffic Calming

      • No, stop signs should be used to control traffic flow, not traffic speed. A stop sign tells drivers and pedestrians who has the right of way. Studies made in many parts of the country show that there is a high incidence of intentional violations where stop signs are installed as “nuisances” or “speed breakers.” While speed is reduced in the immediate vicinity of the “nuisance” stop signs, speeds are actually higher between intersections than they would have been if those signs had not been installed.

      Traffic Operations

      • New traffic signals are normally driven by several things; Development which increases volumes and vehicle delay at a particular location (because of a major jump in use, new shopping center, roadway connection, etc.) and existing intersections that experience increased volumes, collisions and vehicle delay because of surrounding growth or in fill.

      • The City has a traffic signal timing policy that sets guidelines (recommendations and minimum times allowed) for yellow, all red, pedestrian crossing and minimum green times. Based on these initial settings we use the volume of traffic entering each leg of the intersection, whether the signal is connected to other signals nearby or in a network and the type of movements it has (protected left turns, right turn overlap etc.) and enter the information into special signal timing software that allows us to provide the most efficient operation.

      • Once the timing is in operation we watch the signal to ensure it works in the real world. If there is any need to change the timing we can do it in the field to “fine tune” the system.

      • Traffic signals are a tremendous investment for the City. Design and installation costs can exceed $250,000 for every signal installed (plus monthly power and maintenance costs). Therefore, the City must carefully prioritize where and when traffic signals will be installed.

      • Roundabouts typically can move more cars through an intersection with less overall delay than a traffic signal because the cars only have to yield upon entry. This free flow movement results in the roundabout moving a lot more vehicles than a traffic signal that must stop all vehicles in one direction to allow even a single vehicle to turn off the cross street. Another major benefit of roundabouts is the increased safety provided. Unlike traffic signals which tend to have collisions that result in injury (high speed T-bones and left turn angle collisions) roundabouts normally have low speed sideswipe of rear end collision at the entry points.

      • A signal may increase the amount of traffic into and out of your neighborhood because a signal often can indicate that the street is a through street even though it may not be. Signals cause unnecessary delays to drivers during certain times of the day. This increase in delay increases air pollution. It can also cause driver frustration if there is not much traffic on the major street.

      • The City’s Transportation Services Division (under the Public Works Department) examines the existing conditions to decide if a traffic signal is appropriate at a particular location. The number of pedestrians, traffic flow, collision history, vehicle delay and presence of school children and bicyclists are then studied to determine if a traffic signal is the best means of controlling traffic at the location and meets certain guidelines (warrants) set forth by the Federal Highway Administration. Once a determination is made that the signal meets these criteria the signal will be City’s project schedule and budgeted for design and construction.

      • Each traffic control device has its own benefits and drawbacks and each must be carefully considered before installation. Normally intersection progress from no control to yield to stop to signal control based on the need to provide enhanced direction to the user. Guidelines for the installation of each type of device are covered in the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices and should be followed closely to ensure they are properly used.

      • When determining whether or not a traffic signal is necessary at a specific location, the City’s Transportation Services Division evaluates and tries to answer several questions:

        • How much traffic is there on the intersecting streets
        • Are high levels of traffic consistent throughout the day or just during a few hours?
        • Is there a lot of pedestrian traffic?
        • Is the street a wide, high speed, and busy thoroughfare?
        • Are school children crossing the street?
        • Will a signal improve the flow of traffic or cause gridlock with other nearby signals?
      • When a pedestrian feels that the marked crosswalk provides protection from oncoming traffic. Two painted lines do not provide protection against an oncoming vehicle and the real burden of safety has to be on the pedestrian to be alert and cautious while crossing any street. A pedestrian can stop in less than three feet, while a vehicle traveling at 25 miles per hour will require 60 feet and at 35 miles per hour approximately 100 feet. Crosswalks exist at all intersections unless signs prohibit pedestrian crossing. Some of these crosswalks are marked with painted lines, but most of them are not. Pedestrian crosswalk marking is a method of encouraging pedestrians to use a particular crossing. Such marked crossings may not be as safe as an unmarked crossing at the same location. Therefore, crosswalks should be marked only where necessary for the guidance and control of pedestrians, to direct them to the safest of several potential routes.

      • New signals are requested by citizens, other public and private agencies, council members and other City departments.

      • Transportation engineers world-wide are moving toward the use of symbol signs in place of word signs because they are easier for people to comprehend in a shorter amount of time. Easily recognized symbols also accommodate people who can’t read English.

      • The downtown square is the City’s heaviest pedestrian area and the countdown heads provide the users the highest direction for crossing. The countdown display allows users to see just how much time is left to cross providing them the information needed to make a decision to start the crossing movement or not. The new heads have resulted in fewer pedestrians being caught in the intersection on an opposing movement which increases safety and reduced delay to vehicles driving downtown.

      • The City is studying these locations o determine the best possible traffic control device. This is done by comparing the roundabout and a traffic signal at each location based on the number of vehicles which can be served efficiently, the delay of traffic using the intersection and the effects on safety. A roundabout will be used only if it proves to be the better device.

      • Signals don’t always prevent accidents… The City of Prescott’s Transportation Services Division wants to ensure that when a traffic signal is installed at a specific location, traffic and pedestrian safety are improved. You may be surprised that traffic signals do not always prevent accidents.

        Engineering studies have shown that in many instances, accidents increase after a traffic signal is installed. Not only are pedestrians lulled into a false sense of security because of the new signal, but studies have shown that rear-end collisions often increase too.

    • Business Licenses

      • Yes. However, commercial and residential properties are treated differently for business license purposes.

        Commercial Rentals: You will need a separate license for each rental location (parcel) with an annual fee of $35 for each location. The online application type is “Business License Application (Business location inside City limits)”.

        Residential Rentals: Residential Rentals (defined as renting real property for a period of 30 days or longer used for a home or residence) are exempt from the business license requirement.  However, the transaction privilege tax license still applies.

      • Application for the business license is online. First you must create an account and then select the proper application type for your business. On this website you can apply for, pay the required fees, follow the progress of the approval, and finally, print the business license certificate.

      • Yes, you may be required to apply for a business license if you enter into the City to solicit or engage in business. If your business is physically located outside City limits and your only contact within the City is the delivery of pre-ordered goods, with either common carrier or company delivery vehicles, you are exempt from the business license requirement.

      • A single license will be required for multiple professionals co-located at a single business address. For example in the case of real estate agents in a real estate office, lawyers in a practice, multiple hair stylists in a salon, the requirement would be for one license.

      • City Code specifies the following exemptions to the business license requirement:

        1. Casual activity or sales. For example private sales activities such as the sale of a personal automobile or yard sale, on no more than three separate occasion during any calendar year, and musicians, musical groups and other performers and entertainment activity performed at a local venue or special event, excluding carnivals or circuses.
        2. Churches as religious institutions engaged solely as a place of worship.
        3. Schools whether public or private.
        4. Governmental entities, whether federal, state or municipal.
        5. Political organizations and homeowner associations as defined and registered by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).
        6. Businesses physically located outside the municipal limits whose only contact within the City is the delivery of pre-ordered goods.
        7. Employees of another person or entity which holds a City license for such business, occupation or profession.
        8. Residential Real Property Rental (landlords who rent real property for a period of 30 days or longer used for a home or residence).
        9. All exemptions granted pursuant to the Arizona Revised Statutes. Some examples are (1) real estate brokers and agents when primary place of business is in another City or Town AND has a business license from that City or Town, (2) liquor wholesale distributors located outside City limits. (3) producers (farmers) of food products.
      • For all of the same reasons the City implemented this business license program, we believe you will benefit from a safer community, a “level playing field” in compliance, help the City with economic development efforts, and as a side benefit you will be listed in our business license registry which will be available on the City’s website.

      • The annual business license fee is $35 dollars with no proration. In addition, a one-time $40 fire inspection fee will be required for all businesses located inside the Prescott City limits with the exception of home occupations and commercial property landlords. License fees are paid online at the time of application.

        There are additional fees for vacation rental and structured sober living homes which will be paid in conjunction with the business license application. Click here to view a complete Business License Fee Schedule.

      • The $40 safety inspection fee is collected in conjunction with the business license application for businesses with a location in the City limits, except for home based businesses and commercial landlords. This one-time fee is collected to offset the costs of an inspection program.

        Inspections will be conducted on your business to assure a safe environment for you, your employees, and your customers. Fire extinguishers, exiting, aisles, storage, access, and electrical hazards are some of the items that will be inspected.

      • The Prescott City Code requires all persons who engage in any business activity within the City to obtain an annual city business license. This requirement includes:

        • Businesses located within the municipal limits of Prescott, and those who may be physically located outside of the limits but enter the City to engage in business activity.
        • For profit and non-profit
        • Occupations and professional services
        • Separate license per location
        • Special event vendors and promoter/sponsors

        Business activity, as defined in Prescott City Code, Chapter 4-6-1, means transactions or orders for goods and services with a financial exchange. This includes any trade, event, amusement, profession, occupation or performance of services whether engaged in for profit or not for profit.

      • A business license program will create a registry of businesses in the City, updated annually through license renewals. The following factors led the City to implement this new program:

        • Public Safety: To have numbers and types of businesses, accurate contact information in the event of an emergency, presence of hazardous materials
        • Code Compliance: To assure compliance with fire, zoning, and building safety codes
        • TPT changes: Prior to the centralization of transaction privilege tax (TPT) administration to the Arizona Department of Revenue (DOR), the City issued tax licenses for businesses subject to transaction privilege tax. Now the City no longer has the ability to maintain a business registry by tax licenses and share information from tax licenses with other City departments.
        • Economic development: To enhance economic development efforts by providing accurate business statistics, geographic areas for business activity, trend reports
      • The business license is not designed as a revenue generating tool. Instead, the fees were set to help cover the costs of the business license program such as staff, software, and services. The fees are accounted for in the General Fund.

      Vacation Rentals

      • Property ownership information can be found online with Yavapai County’s Interactive Mapping application allows you to view maps and parcel ownership information.  This website also allows you to identify parcels within the 300 feet buffer zone with this icon.

      • Per State law, AirBnB and other online lodging marketplaces can elect to remit taxes on behalf of their listings in bulk to the Arizona Department of Revenue by jurisdiction.   However, currently, it is a voluntary program and not all marketplaces are doing it.  Thus, vacation rental owners are required to obtain a transaction privilege tax license and file tax returns.  A deduction can be taken for any gross receipts that tax has been remitted by the online lodging marketplace.

      • This would mean you are exempt from the requirements in City Code 4-9 for Vacation Rentals.  However, two licenses are still required.  First, you will need a Transaction Privilege Tax License issued by the Arizona Department of Revenue, and secondly a General Business License issued by the City of Prescott. You will be required to collect and remit transaction privilege (sales) tax on gross income derived from the business activity.

      • No matter what the zoning is, the tax treatment is the same.   As a vacation rental operating in the City limits, you will be required to collect and remit transaction privilege (sales) tax on gross income derived from the business activity.  The City transaction privilege tax rate is 2% of the gross income.  For all rental activity for a period of 29 consecutive days or less, there is an additional tax of 3% called transient occupancy or “bed tax”.  All transient occupancy transactions are also subject to a state tax of 6.325%.  Thus, the total tax rate is 11.325%.

      • Commercially zoned property is exempt from the requirements in City Code 4-9 for Vacation Rentals.  However, two licenses are still required.  First, you will need a Transaction Privilege Tax License issued by the Arizona Department of Revenue, and secondly a General Business License issued by  the City of Prescott.  You will be required to collect and remit transaction privilege (sales) tax on gross income derived from the business activity.

      Privilege (Sales) Tax

      • Items sold by Prescott based businesses via the Internet to residents of Arizona are taxable and reported to the City at the 2.75% tax rate. The State would also collect taxes on sales made within Arizona.

      • The tax code does not allow repairs or improvements to be deducted from gross income derived from rental of real property.

      • Yes, if you have a tax license, you must file a report whether you did any business in Prescott or not. To simplify the processing of returns when there has been no activity there is a block to check that indicates no activity. All returns must be signed to validate.

      • Yes it is the responsibility of the business to remit privilege tax on their gross receipts less applicable deductions whether you pass the tax on or not.

      • Yes, the City taxes both the rental of residential and commercial property. The tax rate is 2.75% for all rentals of real property.

      • Yes, at the City tax rate of 2.75%. Both the State of Arizona and Yavapai County do not tax food for home consumption.

      • Yes, the Department of Revenue administers transaction privilege tax licenses for all jurisdictions in Arizona.  The Arizona Department of Revenue’s online application system for licensing, reporting and payment of sales taxes is at www.aztaxes.gov.

      • The combined tax rate for the State of Arizona, Yavapai County, and the City of Prescott for most taxable activities is 9.10%. The combined rate consists of 5.6% for the State, 0.75% for the County and 2.75% for the City of Prescott.

      • 1% is for the General Fund, 1% is for street improvements, and 0.75% goes to the PSPRS unfunded liability.

      • Garage, whether detached or attached may be added to your property. It will have to meet standard district setbacks and if detached may be as close as 4 foot from the rear property line or 6 foot from the rear property line if access from an alley is being proposed.

      • Storage sheds can be built upon private property that meet setbacks and receive either site plan approval (less than 180 SF) or a building permit (More than 180 SF).

      • Home based business is permitted when it meets the criteria set forth in the Land Development Code. This typically restricts the home based business from generating traffic, having frequent customers or having employees that do not live on the premises.

        More details

      • Animals including horses are governed by Chapter 3 (Animals and Fowl) of the Prescott City Code. The number of horses is dependent on land area and setbacks.

        Chapter 3 of City Code

      • Individual stand-alone hot dog carts are not permitted within the City limits.

      • If your proposed split provides enough area to meet the minimum square footage for your zoning district, splitting can be accomplished by a formal application to Planning and Zoning for either a land split, revision to a plat or a replat. In all three cases, an Arizona Registered Land Surveyor will be required.

      • Yes. You must obtain a business license from the City of Prescott and your property will have to pass a basic safety inspection.

        More details

      • Required setbacks vary from one district to another. The best way to confirm what they are for your lot is to contact the Prescott Planning Department at (928) 777-1207.
        Land Development Code

      • A single family for purposes of occupying a single-family home will allow up to 8 unrelated people.

      • In the single-family zoning district, guest quarters are permitted with a conditional use permit (CUP). The CUP is a formal application process to the Board of Adjustment. The guesthouses are permitted to have a fully functional kitchen, stove or range but can not be rented or sold.

      • The sign code provides for signage within the City limits. Banners are permitted on a temporary basis with a temporary sign permit.

      • Development Review (DRC) is required whenever there is new commercial construction, change of use or significant expansion to an existing commercial development. A commercial development includes residential developments, which number 3 units or more or any combinations that makes 3 or more units. A pre-application meeting will not always be required. Contact Planning staff if there are questions.

      Code Compliance

      • All vehicles must have current registration and tags and legally parked on the property.

      • No.  The city only provides for one bulk trash pickup in the spring time.  Should you miss that opportunity, you need to take the bulk trash to the transfer station for proper disposal, or contract with someone to do it for you.  You are responsible to make sure no trash items are left in the right of way adjacent to your property.

      • No.  There are no signs allowed in the right of way.  This includes yard sale signs.  You may post the signs on your property.  Signs in the right of way, a box and rocks, or fliers attached to power poles are illegal and will be collected and disposed of.   You could be subject to civil fines as well.

      • Yes, if behind front set back requirements (usually 25 feet or more from back of curb, sidewalk or utilities) or can be stored in the side or back yard.

      • Yes, vacation rentals are allowed in the City of Prescott and require a business license.

        Vacation Rentals

      • Yes, in side or back yards and screened from public view.

      • If the weeds are 12 inches or higher, shrubs are encroaching the sidewalks or streets or overhanging trees in street.  On developed land entire lot needs to be cleaned, weeds below 12 inches, shrubs off sidewalks or streets, trees need to be trimmed 8 feet above sidewalk and 14 feet above the street.  Vacant lots 10 feet from curb or sidewalk and 10 feet from existing buildings adjacent to property.

      • The city can deem the house unfit for occupation if structure is unsafe. For more information contact City building official at 928-777-1356.

      • Make a non-emergency police report and then file a report with Code Compliance with police case number. We will then determine the validity of the illegal dumping.

      • Any residence that has 5 or more unrelated person living in the home.

        Community Residences

      • Accumulation of filth, garbage or blighting condition.

      • Here is a basic inspection process:

        • Inspection is completed by a code compliance inspector
        • A letter is sent to property giving approximately 30 days to make corrections
        • Re-inspection is done at approximately 30 days after
        • If corrected, a thank you letter is sent to property
        • If not corrected, but progress is made, an extension will be given depending on the amount of corrections required
        • Re-inspection is done at approximately 30 days after
        • If not corrected and/or no progress is made a final notice letter is sent to property
        • Re-inspection is done at approximately 15 to 30 days after
        • If no progress or correction made after final notice letter is sent the property is given a citation by mail and sent to the legal department.
      • It takes a minimum of 30 days and extensions can be granted for more time if progress is being made.

    • Bid Listings

      • Yes, Unless otherwise state on the Notice page, all formal bids, proposals and statements of qualification are opened publicly in the Prescott City Council Chambers located at 201 S. Cortez St., Prescott, AZ 86301 on the date and at the time shown in the notice.

      • The City does not maintain bidder’s lists nor do we prequalify vendors.  All vendors are welcome to submit their contact information and commodity cards or brochures to the Finance Department for our vendor files.  To ensure maximum participation, vendors should regularly check for posted notices and official advertisements on the purchasing website.

      • No, All formal solicitations must be received, and time stamped at City Hall before the date and time stated for the opening of the bid/proposal.  Bids and proposals received after the designated time will be returned unopened and will not be considered.

        Sealed envelopes containing bids or proposals must state clearly on the outside the vendor’s name and address, the bid/proposal number, name of the bid/proposal and the date the bid/proposal will open.

      • The “Notice Inviting Bids” will state if attendance is mandatory for the Pre-Bid Meeting.  Anyone can attend a pre-bid conference.

      • Bid tabulations are available after a contract has been awarded by City Council.  Submit a public records request to the City to obtain bid tabulation information.

      • Contact information varies for each solicitation and can be found within the individual documents.

      • The “Notice Inviting Bids” or “Requests for Statements of Qualification” give instructions on the submittal process for each project.

      • All projects are listed on the “Open Bid Requests” webpage.  Addenda’s are listed in the project information.

      • The Cities Project Manager will contact the lowest responsible bidder to discuss the next steps.

      •  

        Sales made to the City of Prescott are subject to transaction privilege and use tax (sales tax) and must be noted on the bid form as a separate line item of the bid price.  In some specific situations retail sales may be exempt to the City and the City finance Department will execute exemption certificates.  For retail sales by out of state vendors who do not have nexus in Arizona (see Arizona Department of Revenue’s Brochure on Nexus), the City will self-assess use tax.”

      • Results of bid openings can be found at “Bids in Review”.

      • Although a cat in a tree is rarely ever an emergency the department will on occasion make a “non-emergency response” at a low priority to “put eyes on the situation at hand”.  Often times a can of tuna opened and placed at the bottom of the location where the cat is located will coax them down.  We are of the opinion that it is better to respond and not initiate action versus not respond and be called upon to after an untoward event occurs.

      • Residential smoke detectors are early warning devices to wake a sleeping person or persons. Smoke detectors should be placed in each bedroom (sleeping area) and in the hallway leading to the bedrooms.

      • Contact Prescott Fire Department Administration, 777-1700.

      • Fire stations are strategically located with 24/7 Paramedic coverage to provide rapid medical response. In the vast majority of cases, they will be the first emergency units to the scene. The minimum training for a firefighter is Basic Emergency Medical Technician. Twenty-eight of our personnel are trained Paramedics. Each fire truck has the equipment necessary to deal with the majority of the problems that could be encountered at any medical scene. Ancillary problems include extrication of patients from vehicles and equipment, addressing spilled or leaking flammable and combustible liquids, and ensuring overall scene safety of the general public, all first responders, and patients.

        While the ambulance crews do assist with patient care and treatment, their primary responsibility is to transport patients to the hospital in their vehicle. Ambulances carry no equipment to mitigate any of the ancillary problems that may be associated with the call. In cases where Advanced Life Support is needed, the fire department requires that a Paramedic ride to the hospital in the ambulance to continue patient care.

        The Police Department responds to assure the safety of our personnel on occasions where there has been, or could be, the potential for violence at the scene. Police enforcement is also used for crowd and traffic control of the scene.

      About

        • A fire can double in size every 60 seconds, while exponentially increasing in temperature. In minutes, the temperature can reach 1,000 degrees Celsius; too high for anything to survive. In the free burning stage of a modern lightweight construction building, firefighters have approximately 16 minutes before the roof collapses.
        • Smoke alarms and an escape plan will get you and your family out of a burning house alive, but they cannot fight the fire.
        • Fires, and burns caused by fire, are some of the most devastating events imaginable, especially since many fires are preventable and avoidable. The destruction caused by fires, inside and outside the home, can be catastrophic causing major damage, and in many cases, serious injury and death.
        • Fire can strike without warning, any place, and any time. According to the National Fire Protection Association, hundred of thousands of fires in the United States each year cause over 15,000 deaths and serious injuries. These numbers are astonishing.
        • When there is a fire, temperatures can rise to hundreds of degrees in just a few seconds. This makes escaping difficult, and if you don’t move quickly enough to get away from the fire, your chances of getting seriously injured or dying increases drastically.
        • It has been determined that one breathe of intense heat can cause severe lung damage and may cause a person to become unconscious immediately.
        • Fire can move very fast and it can block your escape route in a matter of seconds. You can find yourself surrounded by the flames in all the confusion, panic and become disoriented.
        • Although fire does provide some light, when it is intense, it produces dark and heavy smoke, which darkens the air and makes it hard to see and breathe.
        • Smoke and fumes are just as deadly and may be a major cause of death during fires.
        • Most fire fatalities happen between the hours of 2 A.M. and 6 A.M. This is the time when most people are asleep and, unless there is a fire alarm going off; they may not wake up in time to make an escape. Many people have been found dead in their beds after a fire, which suggests that they may not have awakened.
        • Many people don’t practice escape drills, have a plan in place, and don’t keep flashlights near their beds or where they can easily put their hands on them.
        • During a fire, time is of the essence. A house fire can grow tremendously fast in just seconds, which leaves little time to think about what needs to be done. You must act immediately to get your family to safety.
        • Alarms, sprinkler systems, extinguishers, and smoke detectors have made a valuable impact in drastically reducing the number of injuries and deaths caused by fires. However, much more needs to be done to continue educating people about fires and how to prevent them in the first place.
      • Statistical Comparison Fire Department
        Year 1970 1986 1990 1995 2000 2005 2009 2010
        Call Volume 431 2220 2950 3953 5247 7082 8273 TBD
        # of Firefighters 22 43 51.5 52 57 60 61 60
        # of Fire Engines 6 6 7 7 9 9 9 9
        Stations 2 3 4 5 5 5 5 5
        Population 16,880 22,908 24,905 30,600 35,000 40,225 43,287 47,400
        Square miles 10 24.7 31.14 34 36 38.63 38.63 42
        Ave. Response Time (Minutes) UNK 4.2 4.5 4.2 4.41 6.22 6.37 TBD
      • The PFD has made various cuts to its budget while trying to maintain our level of service and avoid any lay-offs or across the board pay cuts.

        • Due to good foresight we started cutting our operating budget, which is comprised of personnel, supplies, services, and capital expenditures, before the downturn began. Our proposed operating budget has no room for unforeseen emergency costs such as a major equipment breakdown.
        • Wages for all personnel were frozen effective July 1, 2009.
        • Since early 2009, we did not fill the position of two Deputy Chiefs and a Senior Fire Inspector.
        • Reduction in overtime by “bumping down” a Battalion Chief to the Captain seat when we are below minimum manning. A Division Chief or higher covers the role of Battalion Chief only for major incidents.
        Operating Budget for the past 7 years
        2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
        $5,682,311 $6,195,002 $7,312,241 $7,817,906 $7,459,080 $6,995,951 $6,851,841
        • The Fire Department is funded by the City’s general fund.
        • The General fund is funded through city sales tax revenue
        • Minimal property tax
        • State shared revenues:
          • Highway user funds
          • Fire Insurance tax premiums
        • GMHS cost recovered from Off District assignments
        • Revenues:
          • Wildland
          • Donations
          • Off District teams and engines
          • CPR / First Aid
          • Fuels management
          • Grants
          • Issuance of permits
      • Of our many calls this year, your firefighters will not only be at risk when responding to fires and other emergences but on medical calls too. Fire fighting involves hazardous conditions, long and irregular hours.

        Frequently injuries include backs, knees and shoulders. Your Firefighters respond to help those in our community who are the most ill, and are therefore exposed to many contagious diseases. They are commonly exposed to HIV, TB, Hepatitis B, Influenza, Pneumonia, Meningitis, Chickenpox, Mumps, Rubella, Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Clostridium difficile, and Necrotizing fasciitis.

        Many Firefighters are injured or killed each year by:
        • Heart Attacks
        • Responding to emergencies
        • Collapse of buildings
        • Falls
        • Explosions
        • Disorientation
        The Overall Fire Picture
        • There were 3,320 civilians that lost their lives as the result of fire.
        • There were 16,705 civilian injuries that occurred as the result of fire.
        • There were 118 firefighters killed while on duty.
        • Fire killed more Americans than all natural disasters combined.
        • Eighty-four percent of all civilian fire deaths occurred in residences.
        • There were an estimated 1.5 million fires in 2008.
        • Direct property loss due to fires was estimated at $15.5 billion. This figure includes the 2008 California wildfires with an estimated loss of $1.4 billion.
        • An estimated 32,500 intentionally set structure fires resulted in 315 civilian deaths.
        • Intentionally set structure fires resulted in an estimated $866 million in property damage.

        Source: National Fire Protection Association Fire Loss in the U.S. 2008 and USFA’s Firefighter Fatalities in the United States in 2008.

        Staggering statistics from America
        • As firefighters, they are anywhere from TWICE AS LIKELY to SIX TIMES AS LIKELY to contract various forms of cancer.
        • British Columbia – Amendments to the Workers Compensation Act have been introduced to recognize the following cancers as diseases that can arise where a worker is employed full-time as a firefighter and has been regularly exposed to the hazards of a fire scene, other than forest fire scene, over certain periods of time.
          • Primary Leukemia Employed for at least 5 years.
          • Primary site Brain cancer Employed for at least 10 years.
          • Primary site Bladder cancer Employed for at least 15 years.
          • Primary site Ureter cancer Employed for at least 15 years
          • Primary site Kidney cancer Employed for at least 20 years.
          • Primary non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma Employed for at least 20 years.
          • Primary site Colorectoral cancer Employed for at least 20 years.
        • The Prescott Fire Department (PFD) has Intergovernmental Agreements (IGA’s) for Automatic Aid with Central Yavapai Fire District (CYFD), Chino Valley Fire District (CVFD), and Groom Creek Fire District (GCFD). Automatic aid means that there is a predetermined response set at the Prescott Regional Communications Center (PRCC) that allows us to give and receive assistance without having to make a special request.
        • We have a mutual aid agreement with the other area departments. Mutual aid requires the department in need to make a special request for assistance.
        • Under the oversight of the PFD, PRCC dispatches for 9 different agencies, 6 fire and 3 police.
        • Since 1995, we have had a countywide mutual aid system set up to assist any county department on any type of large-scale incident. A simple phone call to a pre-designated “Area Resource Coordinator” activates and deploys the appropriate resources to assist anywhere in Yavapai County. A statewide mutual aid system was recently implemented, which works under the same premise.
        • Since 1990, we have had a unique interagency relationship with the United States Forest Service (USFS). The relationship creates a seamless response by both agencies into the urban wildland interface. The USFS houses an engine at PFD Station 71 as well as two CYFD stations. This is a model relationship that does not exist anywhere else in the United States that we know of.
        • Within the Prescott Basin we have a quick response to any wildland fire. This is referred to as our “Initial Attack Zone”, a 45-minute range in the greater Prescott area, in which area departments will send their closest on duty engine to a wildland fire without delay.
        • We have a contract with the Yavapai-Prescott Indian Tribe which provides immediate fire protection, emergency medical services, and all other call types we manage.
        • We have other IGA’s with: YRMC, Yavapai Community College, Joint training with CYFD, Joint Reserves with CYFD and CVFD, and Disaster Preparedness with Yavapai County Emergency Management (YCEM).
        • Other cooperative efforts are with the Prescott Area Wildland Urban Interface Commission (PAWUIC) and Arizona Wildland Academy (AWA).
        • PFD personnel have involvement in many organizations: AZ Fire Chiefs Assoc., AZ Fire Marshals Assoc., AZ Fire Trainers Assoc., AZ Division of Forestry, National Forest Health Council, Firewise USA, Western Fire Chiefs Assoc., International Association of Fire Chiefs, and AZ Homeland Security Western Region Area Council.

        Our interagency cooperation and involvement in the aforementioned organizations has and will continue to greatly benefit our community. The cooperation has allowed the Prescott Fire Department to provide the high quality of service we enjoy today.

        • Your Prescott Firefighters are involved in numerous activities throughout this community. Some unorganized volunteer commitments include: volunteering as youth mentors and coaches in athletic as well as fine arts types of activities with children at all ages, volunteer in church activities with multiple congregations throughout Prescott, Big Brothers and Big Sisters mentors, CPR instructors, EMT instructors, college instructors, and filling many other community needs or requests.
        • One of the most noteworthy items that the Prescott Firefighters have done recently is, create a 501C3 Charity, Prescott Firefighter Charities (PFC), and ensure that the majority of the proceeds stay in the community.
        • In 2009 PFC raised over $36,000 from fundraisers and donations from the public as well as our own members. Fundraisers that we conducted in 2009 were:
          • First Annual Horseshoe Tournament
          • Car wash
          • Design and sale of 4th of July t-shirts
          • Tip a Firefighter Night at Red Robin
          • Night Out Texas Style at Texas Roadhouse
          • Pizza and a Pitcher Night at Prescott Brewing Company
        • In 2009 PFC donated over $26,000 to organizations and citizens within the Prescott community. Organizations and causes that we donated to in 2009 were:
          • Under-Privileged Children to participate in the Mayor’s Youth Advisory Council
          • Camp Courage Burn Camp for Kids
          • Under-Privileged Children to Participate in the City Bowling League
          • Make a Wish Foundation
          • Yavapai Food Bank
          • The Salvation Army Angel Tree
          • Less fortunate folks that are in need by fixing roofs, or building handicap ramps, purchasing broken down appliances for the elderly that are in need and cannot afford it.
          • Funeral services for recently retired Battalion Chief Brad Malm
          • Flowers for City of Prescott Employees in the hospital
          • The Prescott Fire Honor Guard
          • Fire Department members that had family in the hospital for a heart transplant
      • The current national standard (NFPA 1710 – For Career Fire Departments) recommends 4 people per engine, 6 per Truck Company, and 2 medics per paramedic engine. Current staffing for PFD is 3 people per engine and/or truck and one paramedic per paramedic engine.

      • The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), Standard 1710, details response times for both EMS and Fire calls. The standard states that:

        • Fire departments are required to provide some level of EMS. The standard establishes a turnout time of one minute, and four minutes or less for the arrival of a unit with first responder or higher level capability at an emergency medical incident. This objective should be met 90% of the time.
        • If a fire department provides Advanced Life Support (ALS) services, the standard recommends arrival of an ALS company within an eight-minute response time to 90% of incidents. This does not preclude the four-minute initial response.
        • For fire responses, NFPA 1710 allows one minute for turnout, and calls for the first engine company to arrive at a fire-suppression incident in four minutes, and/or eight minutes for the first full-alarm assignment, 90% of the time.
        • Firefighters are required a minimum 20 hours of fire specific training a month. The minimum training does not cover some specialties such as technical rescue, EMS, and ARFF.
        • Some training is completed on-line or at the fire stations. Some training, due to specialty, degree of difficulty, or amount of personnel and equipment required to complete the training, cannot be completed at the fire station because of space. That training requires special props, a large area to conduct training, and realistic locations. Multiple company drills, as well as night drills, are required.
        • Automatic aid agreements with the other area fire departments require joint training. The training helps personnel familiarize themselves with each other and their equipment, which makes us more efficient on the emergency scene. Automatic aid drills require that engines move out of their area to conduct these drills.
        • Live fire training is an annual requirement for firefighters. The Prescott Fire Department used to be able to conduct live fire evolutions in the training tower located at the fire department training center off Sundog Ranch Rd. The tower is over 30 years old. Live fire training was stopped 2 years ago after a private engineering firm recommended that tower not be used for live fire training due to deteriorating conditions in the building.
        • Central Yavapai Fire District now is the only fire agency in the area with a Burn Tower. The tower is located in the east side of Prescott Valley. Our units have to travel there to receive live fire training. This is a 30 minute trip one way to the Central Yavapai Regional Training Academy. A 20 mile round trip.
        • When units are taken out of their response areas for training, other units are positioned to cover multiple response areas to help reduce the response times.
      • Fire stations are strategically located with 24/7 Paramedic coverage to provide rapid medical response. In the vast majority of cases, they will be the first emergency units to the scene. The minimum training for a firefighter is Basic Emergency Medical Technician. Twenty-eight of our personnel are trained Paramedics. Each fire truck has the equipment necessary to deal with the majority of the problems that could be encountered at any medical scene. Ancillary problems include extrication of patients from vehicles and equipment, addressing spilled or leaking flammable and combustible liquids, and ensuring overall scene safety of the general public, all first responders, and patients.

        While the ambulance crews do assist with patient care and treatment, their primary responsibility is to transport patients to the hospital in their vehicle. Ambulances carry no equipment to mitigate any of the ancillary problems that may be associated with the call. In cases where Advanced Life Support is needed, the fire department requires that a Paramedic ride to the hospital in the ambulance to continue patient care.

        The Police Department responds to assure the safety of our personnel on occasions where there has been, or could be, the potential for violence at the scene. Police enforcement is also used for crowd and traffic control of the scene.

      • Fact: Approximately 70% of our call volume is for medical emergencies. Of that 70%, 55% are true medical emergencies that require invasive treatment to the patient(s). In 2009, PFD responded to 8,273 calls for service.

        While the majority of calls are medical, your fire department is ready and highly trained to respond to any call type without delay. The large fire trucks have all the necessary equipment to manage any incident type we are called to. Call types include, but are not limited to:

        • Fires: e.g. structure, wildland, vehicle, and dumpster/refuse.
        • Emergency Medical Service (EMS): e.g. auto accidents, advanced life support, basic life support, environmental, and psychiatric emergencies.
        • Special Operations: e.g. confined space, swift water, trench, rope, and structural collapse rescues.
        • Aircraft Rescue Fire Fighting (ARFF): e.g. air crashes, declared in flight emergencies, standby for commercial flights (required by FAA), and standby for tanker base flights.
        • Hazardous Materials: e.g. carbon monoxide, chemical spills, fuel spills, and incandescent laboratories.
        • Public Assists: e.g. bees, snakes, fire alarms, and vehicle lockouts (with children or pets).

        PFD has 3 utility type vehicles for special operations which carry supplemental and specialized equipment for hazardous materials incidents, technical rescue (defined as: rope rescue – both high and low angle, dive rescue, swift water, structural collapse, and trench/confined space), and a utility vehicle for large scale incidents that provides breathing air, lighting, salvage and overhaul equipment, and firefighter rehabilitation. We also have three patrol vehicles for wildland fires and 1 foam truck for ARFF.

        • Our firefighters work 24-hour shifts. They go to the market to buy food so that they can eat their meals in the fire stations. Trips to the markets are coordinated with other daily activities in an effort to stay in the center of their response districts.
        • Our firefighters pay for their own meals as the fire department does not pay them a per diem.
        • Firefighters prepare their own meals as a healthier and more cost effective alternative to eating out. At times, due to heavy call volumes, they literally must eat on the run and it is not uncommon to miss a meal altogether.
        • Forbes magazine has stated recently that Firefighting has been named the most stressful profession. Firefighters eat at irregular times and their sleep cycles are typically interrupted.
        • The leading cause of Firefighter line of duty death is from heart attack. It is typically just under 50%. (Ref. National Firefighter Academy Fallen Firefighter Foundation)
        • Back and orthopedic injuries are the predominant reason for early disability retirement. Firefighters will typically exceed their maximum heart rates for extended periods while performing firefighting duties.
        • The citizens of our community depend on our firefighters to respond to and mitigate emergencies at a moments notice. Your safety and our safety demand that firefighters handle the physical, mental and emotional stresses of any emergency situation.
        • We expect our firefighters to participate in physical fitness activities for 1 to 1.5 hours each shift as well as encourage them to keep up a fitness regimen on their days off, in order to stay in top physical condition. We have fitness requirements that they must maintain and they must pass a physical assessment test twice a year.
      • The ability to operate an ambulance in the State of Arizona is governed by the Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS), through the issuance of a Certificate of Necessity (C.O.N.). ADHS issues certificates based on the needs of an area, in other words, a need must be proven in order for ADHS to consider issuing a certificate. There is a current C.O.N. holder in the area that has the certificate for the entire region, and has for over 40 years. That holder is meeting their state mandated response times, and for a much larger geographical area than just the City of Prescott. The process to attempt to gain a C.O.N. from ADHS, especially give the current circumstances would be lengthy and expensive.

      Career Opportunities

      • Consensus standards are developed by specific industries to set forth widely accepted standards of care and operations for certain practices. Standards are an attempt by the industry or profession to self-regulate by establishing minimal operating, performance, or safety standards, and they establish a recognized standard of care. They are written by consensus committees composed of industry representatives and other affected parties. The NFPA has many standards, which affect fire departments. The standards should be followed to protect fire and rescue personnel from unnecessary workplace hazards and because they establish the standard of care that may be used in civil lawsuits against fire and rescue departments.

        OSHA Standards
            • 29 CFR 1910 132.140 Personal Protection and Respirator Equipment (includes 2 in 2 out)
            • 29 CFR 1030 Occupational Exposure to Blood Borne Pathogen
            • 29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous Material Operations
      • Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations are set forth in title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Although most of the regulations can be found in §1901 and §1910, fire departments should also look at §1926, which includes standards for trenching and shoring in the construction industry. State and local government rescue teams in state OSHA jurisdictions are required to comply with all applicable OSHA standards and even volunteer teams may be covered in some states. In non-OSHA states (i.e. a state which does not have its own state OSHA program), even though OSHA regulations may not apply to state or local fire or rescue agencies, fire departments should make every effort to comply with OSHA standards since they can be effective in protecting the health and safety of rescuers.

        • Firefighters start their 24-hour shift at 8 A.M. The Captain lines out the plan of the day for the Engineer and Firefighter(s). Daily requirements are in bold:
          • Inspecting and checking all medical and firefighting equipment
          • All personal protective equipment is mounted on the rig
          • Vehicles and the station are cleaned and maintained
          • Readiness to respond to any emergency
          • Reporting and recordkeeping
          • 1 -1.5 hours of physical fitness
          • 2-hours of training and/or drilling on a myriad of subjects that they are required to be proficient at. The training is done either online, at the training center, or on the fire station grounds.
          • Lunch and dinner
          • Fire safety business inspections
          • Hydrant maintenance
          • Public education programs
        • The average house fire is a multiple hour event for several fire engines. A wildland fire can last several 24-hour periods. The average medical emergency lasts at least an hour, which includes time for our Paramedics and EMT’s to follow up with the patient to the nearest hospital.
        • Firefighters do try to sleep at night, but sometimes they do not sleep at all.
        • Many of the skills firefighters are subject to include rapidly changing technology. Firefighters are required to learn new techniques and technology constantly. One example is a vehicle. Think of how much the automobile has changed over the years. Now firefighters have to worry about air bags deploying, hybrid vehicles exploding, large batteries, electrical components, shocks, and many other items that have changed over time.
      • Entry Level Firefighter 1970
        • High School Diploma or GED required.
        • No firefighting experience required.
        • No medical training required.
        • Primary emergency response duties were fires, rescues and some support for EMS calls. No one was trained beyond basic first aid. There was no wildland fire training, hazardous materials training, or any other specialty training.
        • Training was all “On The Job”.
        Entry Level Firefighter 2010

        (The public needs have changed over the years and when no one else will come to their aid, they call the fire department. This has required firefighters to seek additional training beyond the traditional basic firefighting skills.)

        • Firefighter training does not just deal with fighting fires anymore. Firefighters need to be prepared for all risks now days. This includes training dealing with terrorism and weapons of mass destruction.
        • High School Diploma or GED required.
        • Firefighter I and II certification
        • Basic Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)
        • Basic Wildland Firefighter
        Promotion Opportunity
        • Some positions now require a minimum of an Associates of Arts in Fire Science to be eligible for promotion.
        • All positions require some upper education courses.
        Other Training Requirements
        • OSHA required training has increased over the years. Example: Breathing apparatus training for firefighter, physical fitness requirements for wearing Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA), infectious control training, back safety, and driving emergency vehicles.
        • National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) who sets fire service standards has increased those standards over the years. Firefighter requirements (NFPA 1001), emergency apparatus driver requirements (1002), company officer requirements, and chief officer requirements have all increased and become recognized industrial standards across the country.
        • Arizona has state certification for fire department positions. These certifications are through the Arizona Center of Fire Service Excellence.
        • The fire service is an integral part of the community EMS system. This requires more extensive training hours. Basic EMT, which all firefighter are required to be, requires 180 plus hours of training. A paramedic is required to attend training for up to 12 months. Each EMS certification requires recertification every 2 years.
        • Hazardous Materials training is on going. Once the basic training is completed, 24 hours of refresher training is required each year. The hazardous material technician training is a five-week training session with monthly training required after that.
        • Technical rescue, which includes swift water, confined space, high angle, and building collapse require a 5-week technician course with quarterly refresher training yearly.
        • Aircraft rescue firefighting requires an initial 40-hour course with monthly refresher training and yearly live fire drills.
        • Wildland firefighting has numerous training courses to attend now days. From the Basic Wildland Firefighter to the more advanced. A firefighter need to attend required courses then complete position task books that may require multiple assignments on live wildland incidents before they become qualified. All personnel are required to attend an 8-hour refresher course each year.
        NFPA Standards
        What Are NFPA Standards?

        Consensus standards are developed by specific industries to set forth widely accepted standards of care and operations for certain practices. Standards are an attempt by the industry or profession to self-regulate by establishing minimal operating, performance, or safety standards, and they establish a recognized standard of care. They are written by consensus committees composed of industry representatives and other affected parties. The NFPA has many standards, which affect fire departments. The standards should be followed to protect fire and rescue personnel from unnecessary workplace hazards and because they establish the standard of care that may be used in civil lawsuits against fire and rescue departments.

        OSHA Standards
        • 29 CFR 1910 132.140 Personal Protection and Respirator Equipment (includes 2 in 2 out)
        • 29 CFR 1030 Occupational Exposure to Blood Borne Pathogen
        • 29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous Material Operations
        What are OSHA standards?

        Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations are set forth in title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Although most of the regulations can be found in §1901 and §1910, fire departments should also look at §1926, which includes standards for trenching and shoring in the construction industry. State and local government rescue teams in state OSHA jurisdictions are required to comply with all applicable OSHA standards and even volunteer teams may be covered in some states. In non-OSHA states (i.e. a state which does not have its own state OSHA program), even though OSHA regulations may not apply to state or local fire or rescue agencies, fire departments should make every effort to comply with OSHA standards since they can be effective in protecting the health and safety of rescuers.

      Burn Permits

      • Visit the burn permits page and follow the prompts.  If burning is not allowed for the day, the prompts will notify you.

      Apply For a Permit

      • Visit the burn permits page and follow the prompts.  If burning is not allowed for the day, the prompts will notify you.

      Start or Stop a Burn

      • Visit the burn permits page and follow the prompts.  If burning is not allowed for the day, the prompts will notify you.

      Community Risk Reduction

      • The ISO Fire Protection Rating System

        • For many years, the Insurance Services Office, Inc. (ISO) has evaluated and rated the fire protection provided in communities. The system is called the ISO Public Protection Classification program (PPC). The PPC process grades a community’s fire protection on a scale of 1-10, based on ISO’s PPC evaluations as a factor in setting the premiums they charge for property insurance; the better the community’s PPC grade, the lower the premiums the insurance company would charge for property insurance in that community.
        • The Prescott Fire Department is currently an ISO Class 4 rated fire department. The rating provides the City of Prescott with value insurance rates for both residential and commercial property owners. ISO’s data on fire losses indicates that communities with better fire protection as evaluated by the PPC, do in fact, tend to have lower losses from fire damage than other communities.
        • An ISO rating is based on a communities water supply (40%), equipment (26%), Personnel (15%), Alarm and dispatch (10%), and training (9%). The Prescott Fire Department is committed to improving our fire service delivery to our citizens and continually strives to improve on our ISO rating.

      Protect Your Home

        • Your Prescott Fire Department is an all risk organization that responds to many call types and is ready to switch gears at any time to mitigate any emergencies.
        • Less than 10% of residential homes have sprinkler systems.
        • The majorities of the downtown buildings are not protected by sprinkler systems and have very heavy fire loads. The construction of these 100 + year old buildings have degraded through the years, which poses an increased in fire safety.
        • With Prescott’s unique terrain, along with its growth into the forest boundaries, difficult access can cause delay to firefighting efforts.
        • The main purpose of a fire sprinkler system is to provide life safety and keep the fire in check prior to firefighter’s arrival.
      • There are a few different types of fire extinguishers. We suggest that you go to your local hardware store and see extinguishers for home use.

      • Residential smoke detectors are early warning devices to wake a sleeping person or persons. Smoke detectors should be placed in each bedroom (sleeping area) and in the hallway leading to the bedrooms.

      Programs & Services

      • Yes. Citizens should stay away from the swarm if possible and let bees move on to a different area. In a non-emergency situation call a bee control company in your yellow pages in your phone directory. Or you may contact the PFD dispatch non-emergency number, (928) 445-5357 or 911 in an emergency.

      • Although a cat in a tree is rarely ever an emergency the department will on occasion make a “non-emergency response” at a low priority to “put eyes on the situation at hand”.  Often times a can of tuna opened and placed at the bottom of the location where the cat is located will coax them down.  We are of the opinion that it is better to respond and not initiate action versus not respond and be called upon to after an untoward event occurs.

      Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

      • Any Prescott Fire Station between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

      Station Locations

      • Contact Prescott Fire Department Administration, 777-1700.

      • Answer: No – not unless there is an injury or it is a hit-and-run.  Parties involved may exchange information and contact their respective insurance companies.

      • Contact the Volunteer Coordinator at (928) 777-1988.

      Divisions

      • The Animal Control Officers may be reached at 445-3131 for issues that require immediate attention.  If an Animal Control Officer is not on duty you may leave them a message at 777-1136.

      • The Police Department has a drop off box located in the main lobby.  You may drop the drugs in the box during normal lobby hours which are 8:00AM – 5:00PM Mon-Friday.  Needles, glass and aerosol products cannot be accepted.

      • Contact the Prescott Police Records Section at 777-1988 to obtain a Ride Along Form .  The form will explain the requirements and allow you to choose a desired date and time for your tour.

      Records

      • The Prescott Police Department does not do fingerprinting but you can contact the Yavapai County Sheriff’s Office, Yavapai College if you are a student and or the Prescott Valley Police Department for their dates, times and cost.

      • The best way to find this information is to contact the courts directly. Because we cannot verify identity over the telephone, we can’t release the information if you call. If you come to Records in person, we are required to notify an officer and you may be arrested.

      • Answer: No – not unless a child is locked in the vehicle; police and fire do not respond to keys locked in a vehicle.

      • Contact our Records Section (928 777-1988) and they will give you guidelines for obtaining a copy of a police report.

      • We are open to the public from 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM on Monday through Friday.

      • Yavapai County Jail- Camp Verde (928 567-7734)

      • We are located at 222 South Marina, Prescott, Arizona 86303.

      Crime Prevention

      • Specific requests for statistical information can be submitted on-line or in person at the Prescott Police Department.

      • If the property is either lost or found-you can make an appointment through the Prescott Police Department property and evidence section to retrieve the property. If the items held are evidence in a criminal case or are being held as a result of a court order, the property may be retrieved as allowable by law after the case has been completed through the court process.

      • The Prescott Police Department takes pride in approaching crime through a victim centered approach. A complete and thorough investigation will be conducted and services such as the representation of a victims advocate will be offered. The Prescott Police Department partners with various resources throughout the community to provide a comprehensive approach to victims of all crimes. In the case of personal crimes such as assault, domestic violence or molestation, we work in cooperation with agencies such as the Yavapai Family Advocacy Center and the Trauma Intervention Program (TIP) to support the victim and families throughout the investigation and the judicial process.

        For more information about what services and resources are available to victims of crime, please contact the Police Department Victim Services Unit at 928-777-1936

      Training & Recruitment

      • The Northern Arizona Regional Training Academy is 20 weeks.

      • The salary range for a Police Officer Recruit is $43,243 and upon successful completion of the Police Academy will increase to an annual salary of $47,570.

      Volunteer Information

      • No.

      • They are welcome in all areas with the largest majority volunteering in our Citizens on Patrol Unit.

        • Prepare for the snow season – get the necessary equipment, including snow shovels, snow blower, and tire chains.
        • Be aware of weather forecasts; The National Weather Service reliably predicts winter storm activity. Be sure to obtain prescription medications, groceries and other necessities prior to the arrival of the storm whenever possible.
        • Know what kind of road you live on – City, County, private or public road; and whether your road is an arterial, collector, main residential, cul-de-sac, or residential side street.
        • If you live on a private street, get together with neighbors and have a plan for plowing.
        • Know what is too much. If a big storm is coming and you have a job that requires you to be there, arrange to have your driveway and berm plowed by a private contractor. In the event of a heavy snowfall, you may need to have the contractor plow your berm a couple of times in one day to keep up with our plows, which are also trying to keep up with the snowfall.
        • If possible, please help neighbors who are elderly or disabled by shoveling their driveway and berm.
        • Do not shovel snow back onto the roadway. It is dangerous and you could be held liable in the event of an accident. Arizona State Statute 13-2906 states that “obstructing a highway or other public thoroughfare is a class 3 misdemeanor”.
        • Please try not to take it personally! City snowplow operators are doing their job and not intentionally trying to create a hardship for you. They also wake up, or come home to a berm that they have to shovel as well.
        • Avoid unnecessary travel in winter driving conditions.

      Snowplowing

      • Unfortunately, the Street Maintenance Division does not have the resources to plow driveways and/or berms of those who are unable to do so. Our primary goal is to use the resources we have to provide safe and reliable roadways in the most efficient manner possible. We encourage those who are not able to shovel to ask neighbors for assistance or hire a private snowplow service.

        • Prepare for the snow season – get the necessary equipment, including snow shovels, snow blower, and tire chains.
        • Be aware of weather forecasts; The National Weather Service reliably predicts winter storm activity. Be sure to obtain prescription medications, groceries and other necessities prior to the arrival of the storm whenever possible.
        • Know what kind of road you live on – City, County, private or public road; and whether your road is an arterial, collector, main residential, cul-de-sac, or residential side street.
        • If you live on a private street, get together with neighbors and have a plan for plowing.
        • Know what is too much. If a big storm is coming and you have a job that requires you to be there, arrange to have your driveway and berm plowed by a private contractor. In the event of a heavy snowfall, you may need to have the contractor plow your berm a couple of times in one day to keep up with our plows, which are also trying to keep up with the snowfall.
        • If possible, please help neighbors who are elderly or disabled by shoveling their driveway and berm.
        • Do not shovel snow back onto the roadway. It is dangerous and you could be held liable in the event of an accident. Arizona State Statute 13-2906 states that “obstructing a highway or other public thoroughfare is a class 3 misdemeanor”.
        • Please try not to take it personally! City snowplow operators are doing their job and not intentionally trying to create a hardship for you. They also wake up, or come home to a berm that they have to shovel as well.
        • Avoid unnecessary travel in winter driving conditions.
      • Ideally, the snowplow operator needs at least 10 feet to be clear on the side of the road. Anything less can cause a delay in snow plowing, possible damage to the vehicle, and/or the risk of injury. If the operator hits a vehicle parked in the driveway (yet too close to the road), the operator is instructed to stop immediately and call the supervisor and the Police Department, who will take a report at the scene. Do not park in the middle of the road or you will be towed. Illegally parked cars are a major cause of roads being left unplowed.

      • If possible, hire a neighbor or some other temporary help to clear the sidewalks, or call local service groups, churches or the Department of Economic Security for help with personal snow removal.

      • The City’s snowplow program is prioritized on a “greatest impact” basis. The main roads (arterials) are plowed first, followed by collector and residential streets. This allows citizens some mobility within the community and keeps emergency services as open as possible. Once these routes are accessible, side streets and cul-de-sacs are plowed. With quick and heavy snowfall, it may be necessary for the snowplow to remain on the arterial and collector roads for longer periods to keep up with the snow, which can cause a significant delay in getting to the residential streets. Also, your road may be plowed in the middle of the night and, when you wake up in the morning, more snow may have accumulated.

      • That’s a good question. Our drivers follow a pattern of clearing the most highly used streets first.

      • In the event of an emergency, call 911. If the Police Department determines you have a qualifying emergency, a plow will be dispatched to help emergency crews get access.

      • Do not assume we are not picking up trash due to a storm. All containers need to be at the curb by 6:00 am on pick-up days. Leave containers out until they have been emptied. We will work until all streets have been done, regardless if the street was plowed or not. Due to snow conditions regular starting points on the routes could change due to accessibility. Routes may be continued the next day if unsafe conditions exist.

      • The City’s Snow Removal Policy requires that main arterial roadways and major collectors be plowed first, and then be kept open, so operators may not begin plowing residential streets for several hours after the snow has stopped falling, or up to two days after the storm ends. If all other streets in your area have been plowed and yours hasn’t, please call 777-1126.

      • Our Street Maintenance Division monitors the weather through the internet and National Weather Service. If inclement weather is forecasted, a snow removal crew is activated to monitor and observe the actual conditions. If there is a high probability that a storm will hit within the City, a base crew will be mobilized. When snow starts falling, as observed by the patrol or base crew, our full snow shift will be deployed. This means we may have approximately 12 snowplow operators on the streets. Crews remain on 12-hour shifts for 24-hour coverage until the storm is over. After the storm, the crews conduct “clean-up” operations, where they go back and try to push or “wing back” the snow farther off the road to make room for snow from future storms.

      • You may park on the street as soon as it has been completely plowed to the curb, or its full width. Be careful as it may take the plows more than one pass to get the job done completely. As long as the storm continues, it is unwise to park on the street.

      • For normal snow plowing operations call 777-1126. For medical, fire or police emergencies, call 911.

      • If minimum-width (such as in residential areas) traffic lanes are to be kept open, there is not enough room in the center of the roads for snow. Roads need to be cleared for emergency vehicle access, and narrow roads already limit their access.

        Placing snow in the center of the roadway would create several safety and liability issues:

        • It would be difficult to make left turns across the center berm.
        • Streets are designed to drain to the curb line so the snow needs to be pushed to these curb lines. Snow melting in the middle of the road would create icy conditions as the water runs toward the edges of the road. This would also create asphalt deterioration of our roads due to the constant freezing and thawing.
      • The ridge left behind as the snowplow passes is called a windrow. It is higher than the undisturbed snow level. A windrow cannot be avoided. The City does not have resources to remove windrows therefore it becomes the property owners’ responsibility to create access to the driveway.

      • Our purpose is to allow access to as many streets as possible. It is not possible to plow curb-to-curb during a storm. Plows will return as time, manpower and the storm permit.

      • The Street Maintenance Division uses “gravity” plows that are mounted on the same trucks used all year. These plows do not have the ability to put pressure down; therefore, they are incapable of cutting ice or packed snow.

    • Recycling

        • Household alkaline batteries no longer contain hazardous materials and may be thrown away in the garbage. Please choose rechargeable batteries whenever possible.
        • Rechargable batteries– Most battery retailers in the tri-city area will recycle rechargable batteries. Please refer to the yellow pages under “Batteries-Retail” for a current listing.
        • Vehicle batteries cannot be disposed of in the garbage. Please call an auto parts store or battery retailer for diposal options.
      • For a $5.00 fee, appliances such as washers, dryers, hot water heaters, and stoves are accepted and recycled. Refrigerators, air conditioners and freezers are also accepted for a $5.00 fee, however, they must have all CFC’s (refrigerants) evacuated prior to acceptance and must be accompanied by an invoice from the licensed professional who completed the evacuation. We accept analog televisions for $10.00 per unit.

        Please call the Transfer Station at 928-777-1116 for details.

        • Cardboard
        • Paper
        • Food Boxes
        • Mail
        • Beverage Cans
        • Food Cans
        • Glass Bottles
        • Jars(glass & plastic)
        • Jugs
        • Plastic Bottles & Caps
        • Paperback or hardbound books
        • Grass, yard and/or food waste
        • Plastic bags
        • Styrofoam
        • Unrecyclable caps and lids
        • Diapers
        • Medical tubes
      • Generally speaking, placing fill dirt, construction debris, or other materials is not allowed with any watercourse, whether it is a creek that runs year round or a dry wash.  The drainage function of all watercourses must be preserved so that they have sufficient capacity to convey stormwater runoff.  Any alteration to a watercourse requires a permit and a plan prepared by a civil engineer that meets the requirements of the City Code, including the General Engineering Standards (Article 3).

      • It depends.  Fences are not allowed across drainage easements or within FEMA designated floodways, but may be allowed in other situations where it would not adversely affect the function of the watercourse.

      • Please submit a Public Records Request. The request must include the parcel and/or address.

      • Drainage culverts underneath public roadways are maintained by the Streets Maintenance Division, whose hotline number is 777-1666.  Driveway culverts and culverts or pipes on private property are the maintenance responsibility of the property owner or Home Owners Association.

      About

      • Generally speaking, placing fill dirt, construction debris, or other materials is not allowed with any watercourse, whether it is a creek that runs year round or a dry wash.  The drainage function of all watercourses must be preserved so that they have sufficient capacity to convey stormwater runoff.  Any alteration to a watercourse requires a permit and a plan prepared by a civil engineer that meets the requirements of the City Code, including the General Engineering Standards (Article 3).

      • It depends.  Fences are not allowed across drainage easements or within FEMA designated floodways, but may be allowed in other situations where it would not adversely affect the function of the watercourse.

      • Drainage culverts underneath public roadways are maintained by the Streets Maintenance Division, whose hotline number is 777-1666.  Driveway culverts and culverts or pipes on private property are the maintenance responsibility of the property owner or Home Owners Association.

      Elevation Certificate

      • Please submit a Public Records Request. The request must include the parcel and/or address.

      • Please search for “Elevation Certificate” at www.FEMA.gov.

      Flood Insurance Rate Maps

      • Please submit a Public Records Request. The request must include the parcel and/or address.

      • We do not offer any special programs, however there are several organizations such as St. Vincent de Paul, NACOG, and the Northern Arizona Veterans Resource Center who are able to help those in need.

      • You may contact our office at 928-777-1291 or email us to request email billing.

      • To sign up for automatic payment, please complete the Surepay Authorization Form.

      • Sewer charges are based on winter average water consumption (November through April bills). New customers and sewer only customers are billed using the average of class.

      • If you are experiencing financial difficulties which temporarily prevent you from paying on time, please let us know.  In many cases we can work out a payment plan to allow you to continue receiving service.

      • The City of Prescott offers the following payment options: In person at City Hall 201 S. Cortez or our night depository; by mail at P.O. Box 80067 Prescott Az 86304-8067; we offer a payment box at the Rowle Simmons Community Center located at 1280 E. Rosser St;  or on our website using a debit or credit card and automatic payment through your checking or savings account.

      • Please contact the Transfer Station.

      Apply for Service

      • The City of Prescott does not provide service to those locations.  Please contact the Town of Prescott Valley at 928-759-3020.

      • The City of Prescott requires an application for all new accounts.

        Application for Utility Service

      • A letter of credit is a letter from one of your current utility companies showing that you have been with them for at least the last 12 months with no more than one late payment.

      How to Pay Your Bill

      • The account ID are the first 5 digits of your account number and the CID are the second 5 digits.

      Utility Rates and Resources

      • Even if the water usage was unintentional, you are still responsible for the bill.  However, the city does offer a leak adjustment credit for our customers who meet the  criteria.

        Leak Adjustment Request Form

    • Industrial Pretreatment

      • Common maintenance schedules range from monthly to semi-annually. Your maintenance schedule will depend on the volume of cooking done at your facility and on how diligent your staff is in implementing BMPs. You should observe the condition and the cleaning of your grease interceptor each time it is maintained. If the final chamber of the interceptor has FOG floating on the surface then FOG can be passing through the interceptor into the sewer system. This indicates that more frequent maintenance is necessary.

      • All new commercial food service facilities are required to install a grease interceptor prior to opening. Existing facilities may be required to retrofit their sewer system with a grease interceptor. The City Building Department may also require the installation of grease traps.

      • FOG is a problem for both the property owner and the sewer system. Grease is singled out for special attention because of its poor solubility in water and its tendency to separate from the water and adhere to other surfaces.
        Fats, oils and grease in sewage coat the inside surfaces of the pipe and cause maintenance problems. The consequences include reduced sewer capacity and pipe blockages which resulting in sanitary sewer overflows. This happens in both private and public sewer drains and the extra maintenance and repairs can be extremely costly. When problems occur in the public system, the cost is paid for by the residents, through higher sewer rates.

        Oil and grease also hamper effective treatment at the wastewater treatment plant. Grease as a warm liquid may not appear harmful. But, as the liquid cools, the grease or fat congeals and causes mats to form on the surface of settling tanks, digesters, and the interior of pipes and other surfaces which may cause a shutdown of wastewater treatment processes.

        Commercial food service facilities are required to have grease interceptors installed in their private sewer system. The interceptor helps to remove FOG prior to discharging into the public sewer system.
        Best Management Practices (BMPs) are another strategy to prevent FOG discharge. BMPs simply spell out tactics used to minimize the amount of FOG that goes into sewer drains.

      • BMP stands for Best Management Practice. BMPs are useful for reducing the amount of FOG that goes down the drain, thereby reducing cleaning frequencies on grease traps and interceptors. Reduced FOG also lowers the risk of clogged pipes and sanitary sewer overflows. An example of a BMP is wiping excess grease out of pots and pans with a paper towel before washing them.

      • Grease interceptor inspections will be completed to ensure that the system is functioning properly. The depth of the sediment and grease layers will be checked. The inspector may require that the interceptor be clean if the combined grease and sediment layers are beyond the capacity of the interceptor. The inspector may also ask to see the maintenance and cleaning records for the trap or interceptor.

      • FOG is short for fats, oils and grease. FOG is found in lots of foods such as meats, sauces, salad dressings, foods cooked in deep fryers, cookies, pastries, cheese, butter and many more. FOG is present in many places in kitchens and food services facilities especially on dirty dishes.

      • An interceptor is an outdoor, underground vault, typically with a capacity of 500 gallons or more, designed for the purpose of removing fats, oils, and grease and preventing them from entering the sanitary sewer system. The vaults have a two or three compartment system. The wastewater flows between each compartment and is given enough time to cool, allowing any remaining grease to congeal and rise to the surface. Other food particles are able to settle to the bottom of the vault. Grease interceptors must be maintained on a regular basis to prevent FOG from passing through the interceptor and into the public sewer system.

      • A grease trap is a small reservoir built into the wastewater piping a short distance from the grease producing area (typically the kitchen area). It is designed for the purpose of removing fats, oils, and grease and preventing them from entering the sanitary sewer system. Baffles in the grease trap reservoir hold the wastewater long enough for the grease to congeal and rise to the surface. Other food particles settle to the bottom of the reservoir and form sludge. The grease and sludge can then be removed and disposed of properly.

      • During new construction or remodel of a commercial food service facility the Building Department will require that a grease interceptor is installed. Requirements for the size of a grease trap will be determined by the Building Department, in accordance with the International Plumbing Code. Businesses in existing spaces may be required to install a grease trap or grease interceptor by the sewer utility in order to comply with their Fog Prevention Program.

      Wastewater Collection

      • Not under normal conditions. The hydro-jet cleaning process utilizes a high pressure cleaning nozzle which actually creates a vacuum as it passes by your private sewer line.

      • Call Public Works Engineering Permit Technician at (928) 777-1269.  The information regarding what activities are permitted within a sewer easement is available in the city code.

      • Normally it can be located by visual observation. The sewer backwater valve is usually located near a 3” to 4”diameter sewer clean-out and is often 6” to 8” in diameter.  The sewer backwater valve may be located in the right-of-way at the edge of your property line or near the house.

      • No.  Manholes and clean-outs shall remain unobstructed to allow easy access by City Wastewater Collection crews only.

      • Contact Wastewater Collection at (928) 777-1630.

      • Routine maintenance of your private sewer line helps to prevent obstructions.

        Here are a few helpful tips to help prevent sewer back-ups:

        Do not put bulky paper or trash into the sewers through toilets or sinks.

        Do not dispose of fat, oil, or grease into the sewers through toilets or sinks. Food left on plates can have a lot of grease, so wipe plates off into the garbage. Do not put food scraps in the Garbage Disposal, e.g., InSinkErator. Cooking grease should be poured into a heat resistant container to cool and solidify before disposing in the garbage.

      • Check the yellow page listings in the phone book or contact the Yavapai County Contractors Association at (928) 778-0040.

      • A lateral sewer line is the privately-owned service sewer line which connects your home to the public sanitary sewer system.

      • Contact Wastewater Collection at (928) 777-1630 during normal business hours Monday thru Friday 7:00am to 3:30pm or (928) 777-1626 after hours, including weekends and holidays.

      • Immediately contact Wastewater Collection at (928) 777-1630 during normal business hours Monday thru Friday 7:00am to 3:30pm or (928) 777-1626 after hours, including weekends and holidays.

      • The plumbing system in your home is designed to prevent odors from entering the house by using a Liquid Seal Trap or P-trap.  The water in a P-trap will evaporate if the fixture is not used often.  Seldom used bathrooms, floor drains and utility sinks are common odor sources. The simple solution is to periodically pour water (one or two cups) into the drain to refill the trap.

      • The property owner is responsible for maintaining the private sewer line from the house to the city sewer main including any portion of the private line that is within the public right-of-way or easement.

      • All structures connected to the City sewer system shall be protected by an approved backwater valve, installed in the building drain.  All structures connected to the City of Prescott sewer system shall be protected by an approved backwater valve when additions, alterations, or repairs to existing structures are done.

      • It is there to allow City Wastewater Collection Crews access to the wastewater system for maintenance. The manhole likely existed before the house was built.

      Wastewater Treatment

      • Visit the City of Prescott website for a list of current job openings.

      • In order to purchase effluent water for construction use call (928) 777-1630.

      • To schedule a tour call (928) 777-1630 M-F between the hours of 7:00 AM and 3:30 PM

      • The first step is to get approval from Wastewater Treatment by calling (928) 777-1630. If approval is granted, you must open an account at Solid Waste located at 2800 Sundog Ranch Road.

      • It is safe to dispose dirty household water, human waste and toilet paper. Items that are not safe to dispose are flushable wipes, dental floss, Q-tips, and plastics do not break down in water and are harmful to the wastewater collection system and wastewater treatment facilities.

      • Effluent can only be used for specific purposes such as irrigation for golf courses, washing and sieving aggregate materials, and dust abatement on construction projects. For a complete list of permissible activities, call (928) 777-1630.

      • The Sundog WWTP RV Dumping Station located at 1500 Sundog Ranch Road, is open from 7:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday and closed on weekends and Holidays.

      • Starting April 15th  through November 1, Prescott City Code requires that outdoor watering occurs between 8PM and 8AM.

        City Code: 3-10 – Water Conservation

      • Yes! Visit waterrebates.com to submit your water conservation rebate application online!

      • Yes! The City of Prescott offers a free water use history report consisting of a review of your water use patterns and a water use self assessment. More details…

      • Yes! Visit the prescottwatersmart.com for landscaping ideas, a native plant list, local watering guide, and more!

      • The City offers rebates for both indoor and outdoor conservation.

        Water Conservation Incentive Credit Program Rules and Information

      • The City’s website is full of ideas that can help you to live WaterSMART and save on your utility bill. More details…

      • Yes.  The City on a regular basis examines its General Plans, Water Portfolio, and physical system to assess the condition of water supplies and future growth.

      • Sources of water in the City of Prescott include groundwater, surface water, reclaimed water, and stored water credits. Only groundwater is used as potable drinking water.

      • The City’s source of water remains of high quality and requires little treatment.

        Drinking Water Quality Report

      Big Chino Water Ranch Project

      • In 2004, Prescott and Prescott Valley teamed up to purchase the Big Chino Water Ranch about 18 miles northwest of Paulden. Prescott and Prescott Valley entered into an intergovernmental agreement to work cooperatively to develop a water transmission project known as the Big Chino Water Ranch Project to transport the water from the Ranch to Prescott’s storage facilities in Chino Valley. From there, each community would arrange to bring the water further into its separate water system.

      • At this time the date is undetermined.  This is a supply to meet on-going and future needs of the City’s customers.

      • The City had invested in Colorado River supplies; however, after many years of efforts, and negotiations use of the physical supply was not viable.  Due to this situation, more negotiations and then legislative actions allowed for the City to use physical water supplies in closer proximity to the community.  With the funds from the sale of the Colorado River supplies, the City was able to invest in lands (Big Chino Water Ranch) in the adjacent Big Chino Sub-basin for water supplies.

      Current Supplies

      • Yes.  The City on a regular basis examines its General Plans, Water Portfolio, and physical system to assess the condition of water supplies and future growth.

      • Sources of water in the City of Prescott include groundwater, surface water, reclaimed water, and stored water credits. Only groundwater is used as potable drinking water.

      • The City’s source of water remains of high quality and requires little treatment.

        Drinking Water Quality Report

    • Backflow Prevention

      • Yes, if these are properly installed, they will protect the potable water supply. The device shall be installed 6″ above the highest sprinkler head and shall have no control valves located downstream from the device.

      • Yes. The type of device depends on the type of fire line installed and the degree of hazard, e.g. antifreeze, pressurized, chemical, etc.

      • Backpressure backflow is created whenever the downstream pressure exceeds the supply pressure which is possible in installations such as heating systems, elevated tanks, and pressure-producing systems. An example would be a hot water space-heating boiler operating under 15-20lbs. pressure coincidental with a reduction of the city water supply below such pressure (or higher in most commercial boilers). As water tends to flow in the direction of least resistance, a backpressure backflow condition would be created and the contaminated boiler water would flow into the potable water supply.

      • Backsiphonage can be created when there is stoppage of the water supply due to nearby firefighting, repairs or breaks in city main, etc. The effect is similar to the sipping of a soda by inhaling through a straw, which induces a flow in the opposite direction.

      • This is a combined cooperative effort between plumbing and health officials, waterworks companies, property owners and certified testers to establish and administer guidelines for controlling cross-connections and implementing means to ensure their enforcement so that the public potable water supply will be protected both in the city main and within buildings. The elements of a program define the type of protection required and responsibility for the administration and enforcement. Other elements ensure continuing education programs.

      • A cross-connection is a direct arrangement of a piping line, which allows the potable water supply to be connected to a line which contains a contaminant. An example is the common garden hose attached to a sill cock with the end of the hose lying in a cesspool. Other examples are a garden hose attached to a service sink with the end of the hose submerged in a tub full of detergent, supply lines connected to bottom-fed tanks, supply lines connected to boilers.

      • The most commonly used Atmospheric Antisiphon Vacuum Breakers incorporate an atmospheric vent in combination with a check valve. Its operation depends on a supply of potable water to seal off the atmospheric vent, admitting the water to downstream equipment. If a negative pressure develops in the supply line, the loss of pressure permits the check valve to drop sealing the orifice while at the same time the vent opens admitting air to the system to break the vacuum.

      • Backpressure backflow is the reversal of normal flow in a system due to an increase in the downstream pressure above that of the supply pressure.

      • Backsiphonage is the reversal of normal flow in a system caused by a negative pressure (vacuum or partial vacuum) in the supply piping.

      • The Degree of Hazard” is a commonly used phrase utilized in cross-connection programs and is simply a determination on whether the substance in the non-potable system is toxic (health hazard) or nontoxic (non-health hazard).

      • A backflow device protects the potable water system from becoming contaminated by a flow reversal in the system.  The backwater valve protects the home or business from a blockage in the sanitary sewer system backing up into the structure.

      • Ironically, the ordinary garden hose is the most common offender as it can be easily connected to the potable water supply and used for a variety of potentially dangerous applications.

      • The device that will be required depends on the degree of hazard. Contact City of Prescott Water Protection for a consultation or an inspection to determine the device that is required.

      • City of Prescott Water Protection

        1505 Sundog Ranch Road

        Prescott, AZ, 86301

        Email: backflow@prescott-az.gov

        Fax: 928-777-2482

      • The backflow device must be installed on the service side of the water meter.  Any variance from this requirement needs to be approved by City of Prescott Water Protection.

      • A Certified Backflow Tester, such as ABPA, PIPE or other  certified tester that has supplied all required documentation on test kit certification and company information to the City’s Water Protection staff.

      • The home or business property owner is ultimately responsible but it is an industry standard that the Certified Tester/Company sends them to the City.

      • To be a vendor at an event, you will need to contact the event organizer directly. Information can be found in the City events calendar.

      • The Recreation Services department works closely with the Prescott Unified School District and the Mile High Middle School Staff for scheduling. Please call Michelle Stacy-Schroeder at 928-777- 1552.

      • Reservations for the Yavapai County Courthouse are handled by the Prescott Downtown Partnership 928-445- 5220.

      Trekabout Hiking Club

      • Dogs on a 6ft. leash are permitted as long as the owner is responsible for waste and behavior.

      • Potential group members can try their first hike prior to joining and paying the $18 annual fee (prorated for a half year July 1 to $9)

        To join, an application form (two sides) and $18 fee should be paid to the City of Prescott Recreation Services Department. The form can be found online at: ________ and mailed or dropped off in person Monday – Friday 8am-4pm at 824 E. Gurley Street.

      • Check updates to the City’s website or call 928-777-1122.

      • Hikes are graded on a scale from 1-4 with 1 being least difficult and 4 being most difficult. Group is autonomous in that breaks can be taken as needed or less frequently.

      • Prescott and the surrounding areas are managed by several land managers. Prescott National Forest areas are operated by the Federal government and require one of the following: Prescott National Forest Pass; Interagency Annual Pass; Interagency Senior Pass; Interagency Access Pass; Every Kid in a Park Pass, and on-site payment for one day. More information can be found here: https://www.fs.usda.gov/main/prescott/passes-permits

        The City of Prescott currently has four fee based areas including Watson Lake, Willow Lake, Goldwater Lake and the Sundog Peavine Trailhead. Day use is $3 per car and can be purchased at the automated kiosk on site. Prepaid parking passes are also available at: http://www.prescott-az.gov/recreation-events/recreation-services/parking-passes/

      • Comfortable outdoor clothing, preferably layers, substantial hiking boots or shoes and socks, drinking water, snacks, sunscreen and a hat are basic requirements for Northern Arizona hiking.

      Sports

      • The Recreation Services Department are always looking for part time staff to work in the Adult Sports Leagues. If you have an interest, please contact the Recreation Supervisor at 928 777-1557 for more information.

      • There are several ways to register for a league.  You may contact the Recreation Services Department office at 928 777-1556 or 928 777-1588 to pay over the phone with a credit card, mail in your registration form with fees to City of Prescott, Recreation Services Department, 824 E. Gurley Street, Prescott, Arizona 86301 or come by the Recreation Services Department, Monday-Friday between the hours of 8am-4pm and drop off your form in person.

      • The City of Prescott offers a FREE Drop in Basketball and Volleyball open gym program.  The Volleyball Open Gym is scheduled on Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings from 9AM-Noon and the Basketball Open Gym is scheduled on Monday, Wednesday and Friday afternoones from Noon-2pm.  Open Gym is conducted in the Grace Sparkes Memorial Activity Center located at 824 E. Gurley Street.  The Calendar is available in the Recreation Services Office or you may download a copy by visiting the Basketball or Volleyball pages.

      • The minimum age for all Adult Sports is 16 years by the end of the calendar year.  Anyone under 18 years of age must have their parents complete a youth liability waiver along with being listed on the official team roster.

      • The City of Prescott has a Free Agent list that we collect from individuals who are looking to join a team.  Please contact the Recreation Supervisor at 928 777-1557 for more information.

      • The Adult Slow Pitch Softball leagues are played at Pioneer Park, 1200 Commerce Dr., Prescott, AZ

        The Adult Men’s Fast Pitch league is played at Ken Lindley Field, 702 E. Gurley St., Prescott, AZ

        The Adult Basketball and Volleyball Leagues are played at the Grace Sparkes Memorial Activity Center, 824 E. Gurley St.,  YMCA 750 Whipple St., and Yavapai College 1100 E. Sheldon St., Prescott, AZ

    • Facility Rentals

      • Yes, the City of Prescott has a dog park located within the Jim McCasland Willow Creek Park at 3181 Willow Creek Road. Included are separate areas for small and large dogs. There is no fee associated with use of the park, although user groups are heavily relied on for general daily operating tasks associated with the park. In other parks, dogs on a leash are permitted.

      • No, the City of Prescott does not currently operate any indoor or outdoor pool facilities. Both the YMCA and Yavapai College offer indoor pools and the Town of Prescott Valley offers an outdoor pool seasonally at Mountain Valley Park.

      • Public consumption of alcohol in the City of Prescott is unlawful and a misdemeanor. However, consumption of beer and malt beverages is allowed at the three lakes and in other parks with a permit issued by Parks and Recreation. Please come in person to the Parks and Recreation office to purchase a permit ($10) for your event. For more information call 928.777.1122.

      Campsite Rentals

      • Yes. Reserved sites will be marked. All other camsites will be available first-come, first-serve. Payment will need to be made at the kiosk, located at the entrance of the park.

      • No, Watson Lake does not have a dump site. Dump sites are available at the Prescott Wastewater Treatment Facility and affinity RV.

      • All campsites will be available for check-in at 12:00pm (noon). Check-out will be by 12:00pm (noon).

      Field Rentals

      • No. Pets are not allowed on the turf areas of athletic fields. Pets are welcomed (on a leash) in the spectator sections an dirt areas.

      • Yes, beer and malt beverages are allowed to be consumed at all athletic fields. If a facility is reserved by an organization, said organization can prohibit the consumption of alcohol based on their bylaws.

      • No. Parks Maintenance has specific equipment and supplies for preparation of fields (chalk, rakes, etc). If a prep is needed, a fee will be applied.

      • No. All fields, with the exception of Bill Vallely Upper and Willow Creek Park field, are locked unless there is a reservation.

      • No. The Recreation Services Department reserves fields for family reunions, pick-up games, camps, etc.

      Large Grass Area Rentals

      • Yes.  Tents (e.g. EZ-Ups) are allowed with prior approval. Tents larger than 400 square feet will need to be inspected by the Prescott Fire Department.

      Ramada Rentals

      • The ramadas, with the exception of Flinn Park, have charcoal barbecues available (charcoal not included) and may vary dependent on fire restrictions. Propane grills and catering services are permitted.

      • Yes, each ramada is equipped with a minimum of 1 electrical outlet.

      • Yes, potable water is available in locations close to the ramada areas at all parks. A turn key is needed and a fee of $10 (half-day) or $15 (whole day) plus a $20 refundable deposit will be charged.

      Parking Passes

      • No, the only valid parking pass at City parks is the City of Prescott Parking Pass. Similarly, the City of Prescott parking Pass cannot be used at any other locations.

      • Access to the parks are free every Wednesday and on select Federal Holidays.

      • In the event that the machine issues a refund ticket, the ticket can be brought in to or mailed to the Recreation Service Office located at 824 E. Gurley St, Prescott, AZ 86301 for reimbursement.

      • The kiosk machines accept cash, coin and credit card. Change (coins) will be issued for overpayment.

NEWS

Week of Christmas & New Year’s Schedule for Solid Waste Collection and Transfer Station

Posted on December 18, 2018

The Solid Waste Division will be collecting trash and recyclables on the following schedule for the holidays:   RESIDENTIAL ROUTES FOR THE WEEK OF CHRISTMAS: Monday, December 24th, Normal Collection Tuesday, December 25th, Christmas Day, No Collection Wednesday, December 26th, Tuesday’s trash and recycle route will be collected Thursday, December… Read more »

View the Latest