DRAFT 2021 ANNUAL ACTION PLAN NOW AVAILABLE FOR REVIEW AND COMMENT

The City will accept public comment on the 2021 CDBG Annual Action Plan from April 21 to May 21, 2021.  You can view the report on-line here.  Hard copies are available in City Hall in the Community Development Department or at the Prescott Public Library on the Second Floor “Ask a Librarian” section. You may also contact the CDBG Grant Coordinator for more information.

 

PY2021 Annual Action Plan Draft

Community Development Block Grants

City of Prescott launches “Prescott CARES” Program.  The City has been awarded a $427,000 grant to help Prescott residents and businesses impacted by the pandemic. Funds will help qualifying Prescott residents with rent, mortgage and utility payments and support struggling businesses.

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought economic uncertainty to many individuals, families and businesses, both locally and around the world. Beginning April 19, 2021, Prescott residents and businesses can apply for emergency funds through the new Prescott CARES program. The program was created to help individuals and families maintain stable housing and keep businesses viable within the community. To learn more about Prescott Cares please visit https://www.prescott.org/prescott-cares.html or attend one of the April Workshops.

CDBG Overview

The Community Development Block Grant program is funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Community Development Block Grants help communities provide decent housing, a suitable living environment, and expanded economic opportunities, principally for persons of low and moderate income.

HUD awards grants to entitlement community grantees to carry out a wide range of community development activities directed toward revitalizing neighborhoods, economic development and providing improved community facilities and services. Entitlement communities develop their own programs and funding priorities.

  • Prescott qualified as an entitlement community in 2005 and has since developed four Five Year Consolidated Plans 2005 – 2009, 2010-2014, 2015-2019, and 2020-2024.

The Five-Year Plan provides the framework for the use of CDBG funding received by the City of Prescott from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). CDBG funds must be used to benefit low and moderate income (LMI) households and neighborhoods. Eligible CDBG activities fall into three broad categories:

  1. Neighborhood Revitalization, Public Services and Facilities
  2. Human Services and Economic Opportunities
  3. Decent Affordable Housing

The Prescott CDBG Program has facilitated and funded: Area LMI benefit infrastructure improvements, (sidewalks and street paving), rehab of low income limited clientele rental units, renovation at residential treatment facilities, a tool lending program, transportation for low income seniors and disabled residents, renovation of two ADA restrooms in public buildings, improved Granite Creek Park, created an outdoor learning center for LMI youth, upgraded veterans affordable housing, coordinated outreach for homeless veterans, improved the quality, efficiency and safety of local shelters, supported Meals on Wheels programming and more.

CDBG Annual Allocation Plan

Each year the City funds a number of projects with the CDBG funds available. Those projects are included in an Annual Action Plan (AAP). You can review current or past AAP’s below. Contact the CDBG Grant Coordinator for more information.

CONTACT

  • Community Development
  • Michelle Chavez
  • CDBG Grants Administrator
  • City Hall

    201 S Cortez St

  • 928-777-1205

FAQ

  • Yes. Community applications for CDBG funds must meet the “National Objectives” established by Congress.

  • CDBG funds can be used to:

    • Rehabilitate homes owned and occupied by LM persons or rental units in which at least 51 percent of the tenants are or will be LM and will pay “affordable rents”
    • Acquire property to be sold to LM persons or to be converted primarily to rental housing, with at least 51 percent of the units to be occupied by LM persons;
    • Acquire or clear property to be sold or leased to a private developer;
    • Construct off-site improvements for a developer who will build homes at least 51 percent of which will be sold to or constructed by (self-help) LM persons; or
    • Construct or rehabilitate shelters and transitional housing for the homeless.
  • CDBG funds can be used to:

    • Lend funds to a business;
    • Provide the business with a loan guarantee;
    • Install a water line allowing a business to locate or expand;
    • Acquire land to be leased to a business; or
    • Provide training and support services to low-to-moderate income persons wishing to start their own businesses.
    • In most cases, the business must agree to create or retain a reasonable number of jobs in relation to the CDBG assistance and hire 51 percent LM income persons.
  • Yes. Every community applying for CDBG funds must hold at least two public hearings to let residents identify possible projects. Public hearing notices also must be published in the local newspapers. These notices must be published before the community can send its application to HUD, and they must inform the public about the process to comment on projects recommended by elected officials. Notice of public meetings can also be posted at the local city hall.

  • They require each project to:

    1. Primarily benefit low-to moderate-income persons,
    2. Prevent or eliminate slum and blight, or
    3. Meet other urgent community development needs relating to health and safety issues.
  • Like all federally funded programs, the CDBG program requires that the community comply with a number of requirements relating to record keeping, competitive procurement and public participation. The community must also comply with other federal “overlay” laws. These relate to protection of the environment, acquisition and relocation, civil rights/nondiscrimination and the payment of Davis-Bacon prevailing wages and other construction labor standards.

  • A wide variety of activities including:

    • Street, water and wastewater improvements;
    • Housing rehabilitation or buying land for new housing development;
    • The construction of or improvements to parks, libraries, health clinics, shelters for domestic violence victims or the homeless;
    • Salaries of people who provide public services such as child care or job training, or paying for furniture for such programs; and
    • Loans and other kinds of assistance so businesses can hire new employees.
  • “Low and moderate income” refers to the total annual family income that is less than 80 percent of the average income for same-size families in that area.

NEWS

2021 Prescott Police Satisfaction Survey

Posted on April 28, 2021

The mission of the Prescott Police Department is to provide the highest level of service in a collaborative effort with our community to protect life, property, and the rights of all people. As a partner in our efforts to provide… Read more »

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