Career Opportunities

If we are accepting applications, we post those openings on the City of Prescott’s Employment page.

Please read all Career Opportunity postings carefully and follow all instructions. Failure to do so may result in your application not being considered. Please do not submit applications during any other time period. Only applications submitted during the posting period are reviewed and considered for employment.

What does it take to become a Prescott Firefighter?

The following are some of the skills and qualifications we look for. A more complete list can be found when job openings are posted.

  • Training and Experience
    High School diploma or equivalent, previous fire experience or fire science classes required, Firefighter I & II Certification (or equivalent) and Arizona EMT-Basic (or higher) certification required prior to appointment.
  • Job Related and Essential Qualifications
    Minimum of 18 years of age, must meet N.F.P.A. 1001 standards for medical and physical fitness. Upon hiring, must reside within 30 minutes of the Prescott City limits and possess a valid Arizona motor vehicle operators license.
  • Ability to
    demonstrate good public contact skills and customer service attitude; follow oral and written instructions; get along with others while living and working in close quarters; act and react in emergency situations, avoid panic; pass a rigid physical agility test, medical examination, written exam, and oral interview.

Physical Test

Prescott Fire Department accepts the CPAT (Candidate Physical Ability Test) for all applicants.

CONTACT

  • Fire
  • Cory Moser
  • Fire Professional Services Division Chief
  • Fire Department

    1700 Iron Springs Rd

  • 928-777-1724

FAQ

  • Consensus standards are developed by specific industries to set forth widely accepted standards of care and operations for certain practices. Standards are an attempt by the industry or profession to self-regulate by establishing minimal operating, performance, or safety standards, and they establish a recognized standard of care. They are written by consensus committees composed of industry representatives and other affected parties. The NFPA has many standards, which affect fire departments. The standards should be followed to protect fire and rescue personnel from unnecessary workplace hazards and because they establish the standard of care that may be used in civil lawsuits against fire and rescue departments.

    OSHA Standards
        • 29 CFR 1910 132.140 Personal Protection and Respirator Equipment (includes 2 in 2 out)
        • 29 CFR 1030 Occupational Exposure to Blood Borne Pathogen
        • 29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous Material Operations
  • Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations are set forth in title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Although most of the regulations can be found in §1901 and §1910, fire departments should also look at §1926, which includes standards for trenching and shoring in the construction industry. State and local government rescue teams in state OSHA jurisdictions are required to comply with all applicable OSHA standards and even volunteer teams may be covered in some states. In non-OSHA states (i.e. a state which does not have its own state OSHA program), even though OSHA regulations may not apply to state or local fire or rescue agencies, fire departments should make every effort to comply with OSHA standards since they can be effective in protecting the health and safety of rescuers.

    • Firefighters start their 24-hour shift at 8 A.M. The Captain lines out the plan of the day for the Engineer and Firefighter(s). Daily requirements are in bold:
      • Inspecting and checking all medical and firefighting equipment
      • All personal protective equipment is mounted on the rig
      • Vehicles and the station are cleaned and maintained
      • Readiness to respond to any emergency
      • Reporting and recordkeeping
      • 1 -1.5 hours of physical fitness
      • 2-hours of training and/or drilling on a myriad of subjects that they are required to be proficient at. The training is done either online, at the training center, or on the fire station grounds.
      • Lunch and dinner
      • Fire safety business inspections
      • Hydrant maintenance
      • Public education programs
    • The average house fire is a multiple hour event for several fire engines. A wildland fire can last several 24-hour periods. The average medical emergency lasts at least an hour, which includes time for our Paramedics and EMT’s to follow up with the patient to the nearest hospital.
    • Firefighters do try to sleep at night, but sometimes they do not sleep at all.
    • Many of the skills firefighters are subject to include rapidly changing technology. Firefighters are required to learn new techniques and technology constantly. One example is a vehicle. Think of how much the automobile has changed over the years. Now firefighters have to worry about air bags deploying, hybrid vehicles exploding, large batteries, electrical components, shocks, and many other items that have changed over time.
  • Entry Level Firefighter 1970
    • High School Diploma or GED required.
    • No firefighting experience required.
    • No medical training required.
    • Primary emergency response duties were fires, rescues and some support for EMS calls. No one was trained beyond basic first aid. There was no wildland fire training, hazardous materials training, or any other specialty training.
    • Training was all “On The Job”.
    Entry Level Firefighter 2010

    (The public needs have changed over the years and when no one else will come to their aid, they call the fire department. This has required firefighters to seek additional training beyond the traditional basic firefighting skills.)

    • Firefighter training does not just deal with fighting fires anymore. Firefighters need to be prepared for all risks now days. This includes training dealing with terrorism and weapons of mass destruction.
    • High School Diploma or GED required.
    • Firefighter I and II certification
    • Basic Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)
    • Basic Wildland Firefighter
    Promotion Opportunity
    • Some positions now require a minimum of an Associates of Arts in Fire Science to be eligible for promotion.
    • All positions require some upper education courses.
    Other Training Requirements
    • OSHA required training has increased over the years. Example: Breathing apparatus training for firefighter, physical fitness requirements for wearing Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA), infectious control training, back safety, and driving emergency vehicles.
    • National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) who sets fire service standards has increased those standards over the years. Firefighter requirements (NFPA 1001), emergency apparatus driver requirements (1002), company officer requirements, and chief officer requirements have all increased and become recognized industrial standards across the country.
    • Arizona has state certification for fire department positions. These certifications are through the Arizona Center of Fire Service Excellence.
    • The fire service is an integral part of the community EMS system. This requires more extensive training hours. Basic EMT, which all firefighter are required to be, requires 180 plus hours of training. A paramedic is required to attend training for up to 12 months. Each EMS certification requires recertification every 2 years.
    • Hazardous Materials training is on going. Once the basic training is completed, 24 hours of refresher training is required each year. The hazardous material technician training is a five-week training session with monthly training required after that.
    • Technical rescue, which includes swift water, confined space, high angle, and building collapse require a 5-week technician course with quarterly refresher training yearly.
    • Aircraft rescue firefighting requires an initial 40-hour course with monthly refresher training and yearly live fire drills.
    • Wildland firefighting has numerous training courses to attend now days. From the Basic Wildland Firefighter to the more advanced. A firefighter need to attend required courses then complete position task books that may require multiple assignments on live wildland incidents before they become qualified. All personnel are required to attend an 8-hour refresher course each year.
    NFPA Standards
    What Are NFPA Standards?

    Consensus standards are developed by specific industries to set forth widely accepted standards of care and operations for certain practices. Standards are an attempt by the industry or profession to self-regulate by establishing minimal operating, performance, or safety standards, and they establish a recognized standard of care. They are written by consensus committees composed of industry representatives and other affected parties. The NFPA has many standards, which affect fire departments. The standards should be followed to protect fire and rescue personnel from unnecessary workplace hazards and because they establish the standard of care that may be used in civil lawsuits against fire and rescue departments.

    OSHA Standards
    • 29 CFR 1910 132.140 Personal Protection and Respirator Equipment (includes 2 in 2 out)
    • 29 CFR 1030 Occupational Exposure to Blood Borne Pathogen
    • 29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous Material Operations
    What are OSHA standards?

    Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations are set forth in title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Although most of the regulations can be found in §1901 and §1910, fire departments should also look at §1926, which includes standards for trenching and shoring in the construction industry. State and local government rescue teams in state OSHA jurisdictions are required to comply with all applicable OSHA standards and even volunteer teams may be covered in some states. In non-OSHA states (i.e. a state which does not have its own state OSHA program), even though OSHA regulations may not apply to state or local fire or rescue agencies, fire departments should make every effort to comply with OSHA standards since they can be effective in protecting the health and safety of rescuers.

NEWS

Update on City of Prescott Fire Department Fuels Mitigation Grant – Deadline to apply June 15, 2018

Posted on June 5, 2018

The Prescott City Council has approved up to $10,000 for a fuels mitigation grant to be administered by the Prescott Fire Department.  The deadline to apply is June 15, 2018.  With the extremely dry weather and high potential for fire,… Read more »

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